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We know, Wonkers. You never watch the videos because they’re often too awful. Please watch this story by CBC reporter Nick Purdon about a Somali refugee he found in the snow last weekend near Emerson, Manitoba. It matters. You’ll also see an interview with Ahmed from Ghana, who came to Canada after losing an asylum claim in the U.S., one of hundreds of refugees who have made the dangerous winter crossing from the U.S. after we refused to grant them refuge. And you’ll see Purdon’s rescue of Mohamed, the Somali man who had been walking in the snow for 21 hours and wasn’t entirely sure he’d reached Canada — he was afraid to go with an RCMP officer to a hospital, fearing he’d be sent to America and then deported. It matters because — and you really need to sit yourselves down and think about this for a moment — America is now a country that people run away from.

How the hell did my country become a place people run away from in hopes they might find freedom in Canada? I’m not so naive as to buy into Ronald Reagan’s dumb myth about America as a shining city on a hill, a perversion of John Winthrop’s Puritan warning that we must not screw up: “We shall be as a city upon a hill, the eyes of all people are upon us.” Winthrop knew better than to assume shininess. America is a nation conceived in slavery and genocide, after all. We’re the nation that brought the world the My Lai massacre, and made Lt. William Calley a folk hero. In the 1930s we turned away Jews fleeing Nazi Germany. We sent the M.S. St. Louis back to Europe, and half her passengers died in the Holocaust.

I know all these things. But I still wept when I realized we are now a country a lot of people have decided they must flee.

As Purdon notes, “it’s a quirk of law that if you’re coming from the United States, the only way you can claim refugee status in Canada is if you sneak in.” ABC News explains further:

Those fleeing the U.S. avoid border posts because of an agreement — called Safe Third Country — that requires migrants to request refugee protection in the first safe country they arrive in. That means migrants arriving at a Canadian border post are rejected and told to apply in the U.S.

And if the U.S. says no, the next step is deportation. So people are running away to Canada. Under Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant policies, we don’t do refugees anymore, not for now, because we’re afraid. We’re terrified of people fleeing war, or of people like Ahmed, fleeing countries where good Christian people want them dead because they’re gay. We can’t take everyone. We have to look out for ourselves. America First.

Ursula LeGuin wrote a much-anthologized short story, “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas,” about a near-paradise of a city-state where the population is happy, well-educated, creative, living in almost unimaginable bliss, peace, and beauty. Because this is a fable, there is one small price to be paid for the happiness of all the citizens of Omelas: In a basement somewhere, a feeble-minded child sits naked and terrified, covered in sores and sitting in its own excrement. The child is utterly without hope, and upon its suffering the happiness of Omelas rests:

They all know it is there, all the people of Omelas. Some of them have come to see it, others are content merely to know it is there. They all know that it has to be there. Some of them understand why, and some do not, but they all understand that their happiness, the beauty of their city, the tenderness of their friendships, the health of their children, the wisdom of their scholars, the skill of their makers, even the abundance of their harvest and the kindly weathers of their skies, depend wholly on this child’s abominable misery.

To relieve the suffering of the child would break the deal. If someone ever removed the child from the cellar or even spoke a kind word to it, the happiness, peace, and prosperity of the thousands would vanish. “Those are the terms,” LeGuin says. When young people learn about this ugly reality, they are appalled at the injustice of it all, filled with rage and sorrow, but eventually, they come to accept “the terrible justice of reality.” Because they know the truth, their happiness is tempered with wisdom:

Theirs is no vapid, irresponsible happiness. They know that they, like the child, are not free. They know compassion. It is the existence of the child, and their knowledge of its existence, that makes possible the nobility of their architecture, the poignancy of their music, the profundity of their science. It is because of the child that they are so gentle with children.

And every now and then, someone who sees the child walks away from Omelas. The bargain isn’t acceptable to them. They don’t know where they’re going, but they cannot stay.

I always liked the class discussions we’d have when I used “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas” in college writing classes, although it was frustrating, sometimes, when students would simply slap a label on the story and pronounce it a condemnation of “communism,” which seems rather to miss the point. Sometimes more adventurous students would liken the suffering child in the basement to child laborers who make our consumer goods, which is probably closer to LeGuin’s point but still probably too narrow an attempt at “X=Y” symbolism. But as a fable about humans’ responsibility for each other, and our ability to rationalize the pain of those who are Not Us, it’s first-rate.

America is not Omelas — we’re no paradise to start with. But we are now a nation people have to run away from to find freedom and solace. That’s almost enough to make me want to walk away. But since we’re not stuck in a fable, it’s better to stay and fight to make this a country worth staying in.

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[CBC on Twitter / YouTube / ABC News / CBC News / Ursula LeGuin, The Wind’s Twelve Quarters]

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  • alwayspunkindrublic

    Great writing, Dok. I gotta go to work and feel like shit about this all day, but seriously, great piece.

  • MynameisBlarney

    How did we become a place people flee?

    Well, ya see, it all started with hate radio….

    • Somebody should have strangled Rush Limbaugh in his crib.*

      *With votes and NOT abortion!

      • Oblios_Cap

        With all of his rage and his poor eating habits, you would think the asshole would have stroked out long ago.

      • doktorzoom

        Sorry, even with “with votes,” that one’s really pushing against the rules. Not gonna redact or delete; just a warning.

        — Dok Zoom, Yr Friendly Neighborhood Comments Moderator

    • memzilla Ω

      … and Hate Radio began AS SOON AS Reagan’s FCC eliminated the Fairness Doctrine in 1987.

      • MynameisBlarney

        Yup

      • Grrrr…

        There ya go — proof that life is better without gummint reg-lations.

    • Ducksworthy

      That’s Radio Rawanda to you bub. And it’s all you can get in rural ‘Murrikka.

    • Buzz1313

      It began a little earlier than that. Remember the Underground Railroad?

  • memzilla Ω
    • Ducksworthy

      Also, don’t pay taxes despite what the Other Jesus specifically said about looking to see who’s face is on the money.

      • Shirleyareichert

        Google is paying 97$ per hour! Work for few hours & have longer with friends and family! !di196c:
        On tuesday I got a great new Land Rover Range Rover from having earned $8752 this last four weeks.. Its the most-financialy rewarding I’ve had.. It sounds unbelievable but you wont forgive yourself if you don’t check it
        !di196c:
        ➽➽
        ➽➽;➽➽ http://GoogleFinancialCashJobs486DigitalPowerGetPaid$97/Hour ★★★✫★★★✫★★★✫★★★✫★★★✫★★★✫★★★✫★★★✫★★★✫★★★✫★★★✫★★★✫★★★✫::::::!di196c:….,……..

    • Alan

      Oh I like her.

    • Amy!

      stoled and shareded.

  • arglebargle

    wow

  • Latverian Diplomat

    “Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, and if I’m feeling generous, I’ll let them sneak into Canada.”
    — The United States

    • Thaumaturgist

      The Statute of Liberty wasn’t on the Rio Grande or in San Francisco Bay, it was in New York harbor, facing Western Europe. So quit carrying on about all the huddled masses shut.

      • My Grandmother used to say (back in the 50s) that Liberty had her back turned to America

    • Good_Gawd_Yall

      If Lady Liberty could move I’m sure she’d blow out that torch and hide her face behind her hands in shame and horror.

  • memzilla Ω

    How can I feel stabby and weepy at the same time so early in the morning?

  • Jeffocaster in the desert

    Quote from wiki. I saw this information when I visited the Alamo…………

    in early 1835…The border region of Mexican Texas was largely populated by immigrants from the United States. These people were accustomed to a federalist government and to extensive individual rights, and they were quite vocal in their displeasure at Mexico’s shift towards centralism. Already suspicious after previous American attempts to purchase Mexican Texas,Mexican authorities blamed much of the Texian unrest on American immigrants, most of whom had made little effort to adapt to the Mexican culture.

    • Latverian Diplomat

      “Speak Spanish! This is Mexico! If you can’t speak the language, go home!”
      — Santa Ana to a fast food worker in Texas, 1836

      • Groundloop

        “Fast” in this case being a meal that could be prepared in less than 2 hours. That kind of thing made ‘Haranguing the Help’ a popular spectacle of the time.

        *The More You Know*

    • Geesh. People who lived in Historical Times were so un-American!

    • Latverian Diplomat

      “These people were accustomed to a federalist government and to extensive individual rights”

      The right to own slaves being an “individual right” that was the dealbreaker, IIRC.

    • Thaumaturgist

      What drove the rebellion against Mexico wasn’t the love of freedom or extensive individual rights, it was the sentimental Mexican attitude toward slavery.

  • Oblios_Cap

    Christ! It’s like the flight of the Nez Perce is occurring again.

  • Nounverb911
  • Marceline

    “How the hell did we become a place people flee?”

    By sitting home during midterms.

    • Alan

      Yeah that.

      • handyhippie65

        yea, what they said. let’s just not do it again next year. justice democrats in 2018! fuck the corporate democrats. we already have enough of them, they’re called republicans.

  • Robbertjan Brandenburg

    It’s the laaaaand that they fleeee! Or depooorted as a slaaaave!

    • Amy!

      Jo-sé can you see,
      By the patroller’s searchlight,
      What so proudly we hailed
      At the twilight’s last gleaming
      Whose broad stripes and bright stars
      Through the perilous fight,
      On the wall’s ramparts we watched,
      Arrogantly then streaming
      And the rockets’ red glare
      The rounds parting our hair
      Gave proof, through long night
      That they don’t want us there
      Oh, say does that stained emblem, that banner yet wave,
      O’er the land from which we flee,
      T’ ‘scape deportment or the grave.

      ETA: the meter’s a little rough, sorry. feel free to fix the filk, if you’ve got better beats

  • goonemeritus

    Anti immigrant sentiment comes in waves, since our founding the pendulum of public support has swung from hatred of immigrants to what we have now “extreme hatred”.

  • OneYieldRegular

    I ran the LeGuin story through the Stephen Miller translator and learned that those so-called refugees fleeing to Canada were radical-communist Islamic-terrorists and that we need to make our hill shinier with more sub-minimum-wage child labor under filthy conditions.

    • Latverian Diplomat

      “What am I bid for the ambassadorship to Omelas! I hear it’s a pretty nice place. Really terrific. I wonder if they have casinos.”
      — Donald Trump

      • OneYieldRegular

        “Yes, you there, hand over your ownership of the Marlins to my son-in-law’s brother and the ambassadorship is yours. Do I make great deals or what? Do I?”

        • Good_Gawd_Yall

          I saw that on Rachel last night. Rarely is the sausage-making done so openly.

        • Grrrr…

          Any voter who chose Dump over HRC because of her connections to WalL $treet must be branded with a large image of a marlin. Or a Kushner.

  • Nounverb911

    And the undocumented that are staying here should be on strike today.

    https://twitter.com/VicenteFoxQue/status/832069871957590016

  • Crystalclear12

    He accomplished this in less than a month and we have 47 more months of this.
    People, stop putting the lid back on the liquor bottle, there’s no need.

    • Nounverb911
      • Jeffocaster in the desert

        Some of us have been taking them to deal with the last 8 years abuse of a good President.

      • Grrrr…

        And, once you’ve lost your healthcare: St John’s Wort has long been shown, by legit med studies, to be as effective as SSRIs for mild depression. (Sorry to bust your snark w seriousnes, Nounverb — but some people may need to know….) drweil dot com is a good source of info re: alternative NOT ALT treatments, optimum doses, etc.

    • Alan

      Funny you say that. I haven’t smoked a joint (do we still call them that?) in 30 years but….

      • SkinlessGenderlessMan

        Edibles. Just be aware the onset takes longer, so you don’t eat too much.

    • NastyBossetti

      Also, stop pouring it into a glass before drinking. That’s just a waste of time.

  • Warned_and_Persistent

    Empathy; a word Donald blames on Hilz emails and Bamz’ loser administration..

  • Rags
    • Alan

      Texas so business as usual.

  • elviouslyqueer

    I heard this on NPR last night. Between this and hearing an exhaustive story about how Cheeto Satan might actually become a decent leader if he would only learn how to accept criticism, I got really really really really depressed.

    • OneYieldRegular

      “But he’s going to change! He’s going to pivot any minute now!”

    • Ghenghis McCann

      After 70 years of not accepting criticism, he’s going to change overnight. Yup, I can see that happening.

    • Resistance Fighter Astraea

      I saw a headline this morning that said “Trump Administration Struggles with Messaging.”

      As if the problem is that he doesn’t package up his fascism and self-serving agenda in pretty enough language.

      • NastyBossetti

        Right? They are struggling because their ideas are bad and stupid.

      • eggsacklywright

        If only we could find a prettier ribbon for this turd.

      • Buzz1313

        if the Republcans had any sense, they’d run 45 out on a rail and replace him with Pence and Ryan (God Forbid) I don’t want any of this- at all!- but they can’t be happy with him as their leader

    • Latverian Diplomat

      “We’ve replaced this American President with a decent, thoughtful human being, lets see if the American people notice.”
      — the friendly people at Folgers

      • Resistance Fighter Astraea

        “LOCK HER UP!”
        -The American People

  • Oblios_Cap

    If the Somalis all leave, who will work in our slaughterhouses for low wages?

    • Vincent Ricola

      Once Betsy Devos gets done doing her job, slaughterhouses will be staffed by all the children that can’t afford to pay for their own education.

    • PubOption

      St. Louis and Minneapolis – St. Paul airports, and probably others, will not have many taxis

  • Cousin Itt de La Résistance

    Will watch the videos for food.

  • Bill D. Burger
  • The Wanderer

    “I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that his justice cannot sleep forever.” – Thomas Jefferson

    “There used to be, you know, this place called America . . .”

    • Jeffocaster in the desert

      So said a slave owner. Who schtupped his slaves. I can not reconcile Jefferson’s legacy in my brain.

      • Latverian Diplomat

        The greater the mind, the greater the risk of truly effective compartmentalization?

      • The Wanderer

        Well, the second line’s mine.

        • Jeffocaster in the desert

          Yes, and I try to figure when was the best time where we were the most open and working on real civil rights, etc. the 60’s ? I dunno…….

          • PubOption

            And that’s when Donnie thinks America ceased to be great.

      • Good_Gawd_Yall

        I know. I highly respect the intelligence and leadership while deploring what amounted to rape – well, hell, it WAS rape, since I’m sure the slaves couldn’t object. It would be nice to be able to say it was a less-enlightened time and let it go at that, but there were people then who saw the evils of slavery and cried out against it. It also is unsatisfying to say nobody’s great all the way through, all the time. Just really wish there was some way to make the scorecard tally without cheating.

  • Wild Cat

    Forever. Slaves fled the wonderful US for Canada—the lucky ones who made it, that is.

    We’re waking up from a horrific myth. I thought I was wise to it when I shrugged off my apolitical glasses three decades ago, but it’s worse than I could have ever imagined.

    • Buzz1313

      So glad you pointed this out Wild Cat. Canada has been providing refuge from the US for centuries. Thing is, American school children never learn this because it would conflict with all the brainwashing of how we’re the “best country in the world” we hear starting in kindergarten.

  • Nounverb911
  • Thaumaturgist

    I personally am not convinced that fear is the genuine driving force behind the campaign against refugees, undocumented aliens, gays or other unconventional people. If seems to me that the driving force is a nostalgia for the rage and smug satisfaction missing in American society since the collapse of Jim Crow.

    • Wild Cat

      You’d figure the millions of incarcerated black people for minor offenses and the pogroms by the psychotic police on the black community would be enough wank material for these white shits.

      • Suttree

        They are doing their best to re-enslave them by making them work for next to nothing in our prisons.

        • Wild Cat

          I know. That’s why I sorta laughed at ‘the collapse of Jim Crow.’

      • Thaumaturgist

        The loophole in the 13th Amendment is “except as punishment for a crime, of which they have been duly convicted.” Some southern states made it a crime to be an African American without a job. That’s how Louisiana filled Angola, which is a state-run plantation.

        • Wild Cat

          It was also a crime to look at a white person in the face, per Angela Davis.
          Too late to emmigrate, too young to die.

          • Grrrr…

            OT-ish-but-related: I saw on twaddle a post chiding Dump, by a woman who claimed to have voted for him — and whose page art was a big shot of Angela Davis. Am I wrong to think that someone who ostensibly respects AD that much could ever have voted for Dump? Am I wrong to think there’s some trollin’ goin’ on or that the pic is being used disrespectfully? (Can one brain *really* hold in esteem both Davis and Dump?) Thanks,

    • Vincent Ricola

      They fear not being allowed to be racist anymore.

      • John Resistant Tovarich Smith

        Or not being allowed to be ignorant and live in their personal bubble of bliss. “All is fine with me, so all must be fine with everyone else!”

    • Sardonicuss

      They want to drive out all of the poor refugees so they can re-enslave the poor who were born here without consequences.
      They spent years dismantling the unions to make it so…this is just phase 2.

  • Jeffocaster in the desert

    Nice work, Dok.

  • Crystalclear12

    As a fragment of the native peoples killed for the birth of this nation, I get it.

  • Please click the “Recommended” heart at the top

  • Treg Brown

    I feel shame. This isn’t who we are. In my mind, we’ve been a world leader in humanity.
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/32862940219ed8940651b972c82424c380f006369c53bbb1e1893f3738abe54d.gif

    • grindstone

      This may be the younger generation’s watershed moment. For some it was Kent State. Others the war in Vietnam in general and Cambodia particularly. Back in the day it was Hoover sending in the troops to clear out the bonus army. (And if someone could reply as to how to properly embed a url, I’d appreciate that.)

      I’m hoping that someone, anyone, will explain this in these terms to Trump and the Republicans: if there’s another war, god forbid, we will not be the good guys, and there will then be four decades of movies about how the good Germans conquered the evil American nazis.

      • Treg Brown

        Watershed moment.

        You’re exactly right.

      • Alternative Pony Ron

        <a href=”the URL you want to link”>Your Text Here</a>

        • grindstone

          Thank you, Ron, can I call you Ron? That was buried back in my brain stacks from long ago. Thanks!

          • Alternative Pony Ron

            Yes, you can, as it is the name which is mine. Yeah, it’s tried-and-true HTML, and much tidier than just posting the URL itself.

    • Grrrr…

      1st, I apologize if I wind up saying this clumsily — I have a lot of respect for you, based on your posts, and I hope that remains clear. … I worry that “we” (I’ll limit this to the “we” of any part of a democratic, industrialized nation) are headed for trouble when we think of ourselves as a leader in any particular virtue. Every nation has its crummy and inhumane policies — and we younger nations are still somewhat apartheid, with the descendants of slaves, and/or with contempo first-nations or indigenous peoples, getting a raw deal.
      ….. Yes, let’s treasure the ideals on which modern democs have been built — but let’s not think we’re farther along than we are, bc that leads to complacency — and, by extenson, neo-fascists in the WH. Cheers. (And thanks for an amazing GIF.)

      • Treg Brown

        “…we think of ourselves as a leader in any particular virtue.”

        I completely agree. I think this is defining that moment when I stop seeing the world with the eyes of a child, and start seeing as an adult. That watershed moment someone brilliant suggested to me, and I agree. We ARE a relatively young country, and has our mettle truly been tested, at least from an internal perspective. We must stay engaged, humanely and with realistic expectation, and trod on.

        Thank you for the kind words. You said it beautifully.

  • Jeffocaster in the desert

    Been watching West WIng. In addition to being depressing because we don’t have a thoughtful humble President, all the topics are still relevant, which means nothing seems to be changing. Sigh………..

    • NastyBossetti

      That is one thing that strikes me with every re-watch. We’re still having all the same damn arguments over and over and over again.

  • Suttree

    Nicely put Dok. I was unaware of that LeGuin story.

  • OddMan

    And good citizens who were born here and served 8 years in the Navy are thinking of leaving.
    Me and my wife have started making plans on leaving, to somewhere in the Southern Hemisphere. And we are too damn old for this shit.

    • Hutch

      I’m eyeing some property a friend has near the beach in Ensenada. If I improve it, I can live there for free. But I’m WAY too old for this shit!

  • anwisok

    Fuuuuuuuuck. What a way to start the day! Thanks, Dok!
    Here. Have some critters, being funny:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtoknSe54gs

  • Lance Thrustwell

    I read that story a looong time ago, and actually I’d forgotten all about it until you mentioned it just now, Dok. Back when I was giving college teaching the ol’ college try, I probably had room to squeeze that story into the syllabus. Wish now that I had.

  • Chadwells
    • MynameisBlarney

      It’s going to be like that until trump is removed from office.

  • Latverian Diplomat

    As a Latverian, I find this American hostility to fictional countries to be typically naive. We are not just cautionary tales! We are also lovely vacation destinations.

    • dshwa

      Allis not gallon and Doom?

      • Latverian Diplomat

        All is Doom, whose enlightenment is the very antithesis of gloom.

  • Proud Liberal

    Everybody enjoying the authoritarian state? Fuck….

  • msanthropesmr

    A sad commentary.
    But remember folks, more in this country had a vision for a better leader, and there’s more of us than them.
    Call your representative.
    Show up to support those who are vulnerable and cannot support themselves.
    Show up for all elections.
    Get involved in local politics.
    Get a bullhorn and stand outside your reps house.

    We will win, if we put as much energy into the process as we have sorrow about our country.

    • Jeffocaster in the desert

      I am glad you are taking up the mantle kiddo. I am tired. I have been in this fight since I dragged your little butt to DC in 1971 to protest the war in Vietnam.

      • msanthropesmr

        Going to the mosque for dinner Saturday.

        • Jeffocaster in the desert

          I wish I could join you.

  • Michael Smith

    Does the story include a school of thought within Omela that creates justifications for the child’s suffering? That claims that the child has no one to blame but himself? That if he were as strong and moral and freedom-loving as the people of Omela, that he wouldn’t be in that mess to begin with?

    Oh, and eventually there might be some people who say “This makes no sense. Why don’t we just teach history, and remind people constantly of the kind of misery that can exist if we aren’t vigilant about our respect for humanity and defense of human dignity?” And they will prove that they are correct, and draw enough people to their side – the people who otherwise would have left the city. But a superstitious and tradition-bound faction emerges and is terrified by the uncertainty, and outraged at the heresy. They teach their followers to love watching the child’s torture. Images of the child’s torture are posted on bumpers and shared as joyful memes. They push for even more torture, because that would create even more prosperity.

    Eventually it results in a complete implosion of the city. Maybe after the battle, the chief antagonist survives and struggles to a nearby settlement, seeking refuge. The city, in the midst of its own struggles, sees an opportunity to unite the people, and takes the antagonist and chains him up in a basement as an example of what can happen when society crumbles.

    • Shan McStroppyPants

      Yes. Well said.

      Unlike the citizens of Omela, our comfort depends on our ability to NOT see the suffering because if we see it we might feel obligated to do something about it or feel complicit in creating and sustaining it. So we either ignore it or blame the sufferers for what is happening to them.

      • eggsacklywright

        Any luck on the job search?

        • Shan McStroppyPants

          Enh. I will do better at it now that I’m finally able to get up and shower every day and eat fairly regularly.

    • Doug Langley

      Non hypothetical example: I was a site where some hiring manager was giving his tips for finding a job. What are some reasons people can’t get a job?

      “You’re depressed. Take an anti-depressant. If you’re crying and having trouble sleeping, see your doctor.”
      “You’re angry. Get over it. There’s nothing personal when the boss fires you, it’s just a business decision.”

      Etc.

      • Zippy W Pinhead

        It may not be personal to the guy doing the firing, but it’s personal as hell to the one being fired.

        It’s a funny thing- I’ve fired people before. I never was blasé about it, it was the hardest part of being a boss for me. The fact that so many of these people tuned out their humanity and compartmentalised their feelings to the point they think it’s NBD when they fire, or worse yet lay off thousands, is really an indictment on how far we’ve fallen in this country.

        • Doug Langley

          “. . . but it’s personal as hell to the one being fired.”

          A thousand upvotes for that.

        • I have for the most part hated having to let someone go, or being a part of that process. In all the times I’ve been a supervisor, I can only recall once that I was happy to fire someone. Of course, they were such an incredible screw up who had made my life a living hell had something to do with that.

          • Zippy W Pinhead

            Very rarely is someone so odious that you look forward to firing them. More often, they simply aren’t cut out for the job, or in the case of layoffs the last hired so the first fired. Anyone who doesn’t feel a little bad about having to do so in those circumstances is lacking in humanity.

          • This was the only time, and yes, he was a special case. As in, rude to his fellow employees, unable or willing to do his job properly (daily counseling sessions, too), a sexual harassment complaint filed by a member of the public, and the final straw, showing up at my field office at 11PM drunk, and wanting to pick a fight. The next morning, I heard from a couple of my female staffers that before he’d shown up at my door, he’d visited them, and when they told him to leave, called them uneducated sluts who would never amount to anything. I called my boss, who had the final say about it, and said “I want him gone.” When he showed up for work, I called him in and told him he was done. He didn’t take it well. To say that I was happy to see the back of him was an understatement.

      • Rags

        Reminds me of a ‘how to buy a used car’ book I checked out of the library. Boiled down, the advice was: ‘Pick the make model and year of car you want and find the most expensive version of it at a dealership and pay what is asked since of course the salespeople know best.’

        • Doug Langley

          Golly. I just can’t imagine who might have written that book.

          • Rags

            a used car salesman, natch.

      • Grrrr…

        “It’s business, it’s not personal” — possibly the words I hate the most. As long as a human being is involved, it’s person-al. (‘Course, soon as the workforce is all robots and AI, mgmt can use that sucker to its “heart’s” content.)

  • Proud Liberal

    ” United States of Hate Has Exploded Under Trump”

    http://www.alternet.org/election-2016/united-states-hate-has-exploded-under-trump

  • Sandy Beaches

    I’m proud to be an American, where at least I know…aw, fuck it.

    • House0fTheBlueLights

      K, thanks, you ruined that song me. Fuck.

      • Sandy Beaches

        Oops. I forgot you were a secret fan. But, in my defense, the poor grammar should have turned you off from it long ago :p

  • MynameisBlarney
    • The Wanderer

      The Bible that was on Kirk’s desk in the Mirror Universe.

      • Blackest Noobs

        i dunno if i think Kirk was a conservative. Picard most definitely had Voltaire.

    • Wild Cat

      Hasn’t this always been true? Hell, 120,000,000 Christians (and almost 6 million Jews) were killed by Christians from 1914 through 1945: soldier, civilian, man, woman, child, infant . . .

    • Blackest Noobs

      so sorta kinda tangent to the god stuff…currently there’s a movie out called the Case for Christ….which is a bunch of nonsense from a supposedly atheist lawyer who went to disprove Jesus to only become a true believer and a person who made a hefty profit writing the same fucking book over and over again.

      here’s the thing…even if you take the Bible as the God© Honest Truth…even the freakin’ Bible has conflicting Jesus stories.

      Did a Historical Jesus exist? yeah, there’s some evidence, kinda shaky at that, but there is some evidence of that.

      Was there a Magical Jesus? eh….lottsa of conjecture and hearsay but not much in actual factual evidence.

      Though maybe the conflicting Jesus stories in the Bible can be explained by String Theory…i.e….multiple universes….we just got a double heaping of Jesus instead of a Earth-2.

  • Warned_and_Persistent

    With GOP budget cuts to the Nat’ Parks monuments, Manitoba agrees to accept the costs of the Statue of Liberty relocation since she deserves a better home.

  • TJ Barke

    A place so great, that people have to flee for their own well being…
    #sickofwinning

  • Lizzietish81
  • Msgr_MΩment

    Frozen hellhole > USA. Got it.

    • Alan

      Canada is a wonderful place.

      • Except for Saskatchewan and mosquitoes in summer and Newfoundland in winter

        • Résistance Land Shark

          Winter wonderland and those mosquitos are pets.

          • snigsy

            They’re the national bird.

    • Alternative Pony Ron

      Manitoba isn’t always a frozen hellhole. The rest of the year it’s under water.

  • Marceline

    We actually have a group of teabaggers here planning to do an anti-immigration protest at Sherrod Brown’s office the same time a naturalization ceremony is going on. That’s the kind of country we’ve become.

    • Good_Gawd_Yall

      Those aren’t teabaggers – they’re fucking Nazis whose sheets are at the drycleaners. I hate these people.

    • HooverVilles

      Sigh!

  • Bub the Hoohah! loving Zombie

    Wanna feel Thursday mornin’ stabby?

    Susan Sarandon has no regrets for her refusal to vote for Hillary Clinton, and she in no way feels responsible for Donald Trump or his shocking electoral win. In fact, she blames journalists like Chris Hayes for failing to cover the issues.

    The actress and activist went on MSNBC’s “All in with Chris Hayes” Wednesday night to give the nation an update on her convictions about the election. Back in March, when Sarandon was a surrogate for the Bernie Sanders campaign, she implied on Hayes’ show that Trump would be a better alternative for progressives than Clinton.
    “Some people believe Donald Trump will bring the revolution immediately,” Sarandon said. “If you think it is pragmatic to shore up the status quo right now, then you are not in touch with the status quo. The status quo is not working.”
    Presented with the then-hypothetical choice of Trump or Clinton, Sarandon said, “I don’t know.”

    One wonders how many refugees being deported or refused entry into the U.S., how many desperate people resorting to slogging through the snow to Canada because their alternatives are worse, how many domestic abuse victims being arrested by ICE, would be enough for her to finally pull her botoxed head out of her liposuctioned ass and realize the damage that her ivory tower liberalism is doing to real fucking people. I suspect that we’ll never get to a high enough number. Fucking nitwit.

    http://www.salon.com/2017/02/16/you-consider-yourself-a-journalist-right-susan-sarandon-chris-hayes-have-tense-exchange-over-hillary-clinton-donald-trump/

    • Jeffocaster in the desert

      Ralph Nader syndrome. (I don’t get my way, I ruin your party and I don’t care if I have any influence in the future)

      • Wild Cat

        I was actually suckered by him. Now I suspect he was paid-off by the GOP to run, and he was game because the Dems never gave him a lifetime appointment to whine in the 1960s. I should have realized this Nader assklown had no infrastructure, no serious desire to lead—just to destroy.

        • Marceline

          I voted for Nader. I consider it my single biggest mistake as a voter. Now in hindsight I suspect Bernie was getting help from the Russians just like Nader got help from the GOP.

          • Chyron HR

            That’s unfair to Bernie. I’m sure he was just being used by his campaign manager, former Russian political consultant Tad Devine.

          • House0fTheBlueLights

            Nader woke me up. That was the first time I voted for a mainstream candidate. Given our political structure, third party = third rail for whoever that candidate most closely aligns with.

        • Rags

          I saw Nader talk in around 1969. I liked a lot of what he said but my immediate impression was that he had absolutely no sense of humor. I think my initial opinion has proven correct over time and I also think that people without senses of humor (4-5, anyone?) should not be in positions of responsibility.

          But I joke.

      • Royal Ugly Dude

        In 2004, I saw a Ford Taurus with a Nader for President bumper sticker. I wondered why anyone would have one after what happened in 2000, so I sped up to pass the car and see who was driving. It was Ralph Nader.

        • Persistent Demme

          I wonder how much of himself he sees in narcissist T***p.

        • handyhippie65

          did you flip his ass off?

    • dshwa

      If first they came for Sarandon, I’d wait for whoever they came for second.

    • Wild Cat

      She deserves her washed-up role as Joan Crawford, where she’ll probably earn $3M+—enough to support her revolution and lifestyle overseas.

      What an idiot.

    • Dear Susan, careful you don’t buy any dodgy vaginal eggs; you might also start thinking about the stupidity of your pronouncement.

    • Marceline

      That vicious bitch and the rest of the purity progs will never own up to the damage they caused. They’re no different than Trumpers in that respect.

      • What the overwhelming majority of these morons understand about politics – and in particular, political parties – could be written on the head of a pin with room left over.

    • Zippy W Pinhead

      Susan Sarandon, the quintessential limousine liberal calling for the tsunami to wash away all the perceived problems she rails against, safe and secure in the knowledge that her Manhattan penthouse is well above the high water line and completely oblivious to all the pain and suffering that will happen to those not fortunate enough to be able to escape the deluge…

      • ZangoCrudmonger

        Let it come down.

    • One of the things that pisses me off about people like her is that they’re always people who won’t be affected by the results. She can go off to any number of other countries and live a very comfortable life, or stay here and live a comfortable life. One wonders what would happen if suddenly the FBI were to show up at her door, and make her “disappear” into a holding facility for political malcontents.

    • Thaumaturgist

      Have we forgotten about Jill Stein’s Russian connection? http://www.dailykos.com/story/2016/11/22/1603031/-Jill-Stein-s-Connection-to-Putin

      • Edith Prickly

        I haven’t.

      • LucindathePook

        Nor I. I was thinking about her a few days ago while reading a story someplace about how Putin was working with candidates in parties in other countries, such as the Greens, to offer diversions that would keep the other parties from coalescing or becoming more mainstream so that they offered a strong challenge to his contenders. And I put on my tinfoil hat and thought “Jill.”

    • Zippy W Pinhead
      • Bub the Hoohah! loving Zombie

        I already have enough, but thanks.

    • Sophie McMillan

      I was watching this with my 17 yr old ( who is just beginning to get more into politics) and she yelled at the TV machine ” answer the bollocking question” ( UK parents influence in language). That was one of the most blatant examples of deflection and smoke blowing. I am not sure how Hayes kept his calm. Maddow’s rolling eyes and comment were very telling

    • Persistent Demme

      Lawyer-daughter has been busy explaining “white privilege” to me.
      I’d like to thank Susan Sarandon for being a shining example of this.

    • LucindathePook

      I’m glad somebody saw this besides me. I caught the last little bit and wanted to smack her. With non-votes.

    • Snopes Shop

      Hate hate hate hate hate

    • Grrrr…

      So money is democratic (small d) in making people idiots. Easy for her (with nice house, food, healthcare, luxuries) to not give a crap about the millions who, because of Dump’s policies, will go hungry, have shitty schools, fall ill, die.
      ……. No wonder so many people bash Hollywood liberals; she’s giving a bad name to every HW-er who actually has something useful to say.
      ……. In LeGuin’s terms, I think SS’s vote brought misery to many without even alleviating the suffering of the child.

    • handyhippie65

      dammit, this cunty bitch is gonna make me hate one of my favorite movies if she keeps it up. where’s tim curry when we need him?

  • dshwa

    We’ve never been as good as we’ve claimed. But now, we are as bad as we’ve always feared we really were.

    • Zippy W Pinhead

      We’re as bad as those we condemn

      • Up In Smoke O’hontas

        Worse. We are hypocrites.

  • Cousin Itt de La Résistance

    When I tell folks I lived in Denmark for a short time and what a happy, safe place it is, what I hear back is some version of, “can’t happen here, it’s a small country, all the same people.”

    I still cannot fathom how that argument works. If anything, our diversity could make us stronger and happier than even Denmark. To me, the argument is one that blames our diversity for our many weaknesses when it’s more about the sadly enduring legacy of racism, classism, and social Darwinism woven into our historical DNA.

    • Alternative Pony Ron

      Diversity WORKS. Much of what makes Canada a decent place to live is that Canadians come from literally everywhere. In Toronto you can really see it – you can cross a street and see the languages on a street sign change. We don’t always get it right, and not everybody thinks it’s a good idea, but to someone who was old enough to watch as the country began to change it’s something to be proud of, and something to keep alive.

      • ltmcdies

        and we can thank , in part, the multiculturalism policies of one Pierre Elliot Trudeau….
        and sadly your right, not everybody thinks it’s a good idea…such as the CPC who are arguing against a bill in parliament condemning Islamophobia…

        http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/islamophobia-m103-joly-anderson-1.3985499

        • Fuck the Cons. So very hard.

        • Alternative Pony Ron

          I guess, since that sort of strategy didn’t work in the last election, they feel obligated to do it even HARDER now.
          Sounds familiar, dunnit?

      • Persistent Demme

        Just as a small example, (I lived there for 4 years): modeling agencies used to come up to Toronto because the exotic mix of races produced combinations of unique beauty that no one had seen before.

    • Ms.MLG on Maui

      Exactly. We took what should have been our greatest strength, diversity, and made it into our biggest problem. What a fucking shame.

    • Grrrr…

      I think the problem lies not in diversity of population but in large and varied land mass combined with large population; once a nation exceeds 100mil — this is just my tinfoil hat talking, based on my observations — there are too many metaphorical alleyways in which Special Interests can lurk and furtively seize control.
      ….. Contrast the US with Canada and Australia: Big/varied land and masses and diverse populations, but SMALL-ish populations — manageable — either people’s voices are actually heard or they believe that their voices are heard, which keeps society civil. And, consider the many European nations with about 80mil or fewer, and smaller land masses — life is working far better in all of those nations than it is here (healthcare, education, parental leave, annual leave, standard of living, overall satisfaction with life).
      ….. It’s daunting to meet the diverse socioeconomic needs of 300mil; add to that the extreme-weather challenges and infrastructure challenges of prairies plus Rockies plus coastal areas, all 3000 miles apart — it is a LOT to tackle. And then multiply that by 10, because big land mass also means nooks and crannies for Cliven Bundy et al., fucking up life not just with their standoffs but also with their insane, ugly ideas — ideas that have languished, unchallenged, partly bc of the isolating terrain, which in turn is part of the enduring attachment to semi-myth of the Rugged Pioneers Who Made This County Great And Don’t Need No Govmint Innaference In Any Way..
      ….. I don’t *want* to give up or believe that it’s too late for this country. But at some level, I believe it is. I’ll keep fighting — but I do think it’s too late because we are just too big. Christiane Northrup has said (bad paraphrase) that we’re wired to be able to care about clans of a certain size, and more than that is overload. I’ll try to dig up the quote in case I’m butchering the idea.
      ….. Meanwhile, think about size in a different context: One department store owned by a family works; even 6 within, say, a 50-mi radius works — small enough distance and small enough staff for the owners to know the employees — which is critical in treating them as persons with needs rather than as salaries to be cut so the owners can have more marble and gold — and small enough for owners to be known by staff, so relationships and mutual loyalty can flourish. But this model doesn’t work once too many stores are spread over too great a distance — if the owner can’t walk each store at least once a week and recognize the employees’ faces, it just won’t work. And that’s where we are, I fear.

  • Asterix

    I first heard these stories on NPR over the weekend and had the same question – how did we get here?

    More than 20 years of hate TV & Radio, lying about immigrants destroying this country and Republicans hating anyone who is not white and male. This has led Americans who already believed there was a problem with immigrants to become even more inflamed, electing ever more hate-filled and regressive Republicans to “deal with the problem”. It’s been a vicious and growing circle for more than two decades, delivering to us the bigoted, paranoid, delusional, malignant narcissist moron currently in the White House.

    To combat it we must take back the State Houses as well as Congress. To do that, the majority of us must vote. 49.2 % of registered voters did not vote, which is the real reason we have Trump and hate-filled, regressive State Houses like WI, KS, NC, FL, AZ, etc. Get out the message to those who didn’t vote and then drive them to the polls.

  • shastakoala

    Tragic. Well done Dok.

  • Isabella Martin

    We know this is not who the American people are. We will take care of your refugees until you are back on your feet. I am horrified for you.

    • Zippy W Pinhead

      I am horrified for us too.

    • Old Man Yells at Cloud

      After watching this country for the past few decades, I’m afraid it is exactly who the US has become.. a tough-talking flag-waving panty waist who is afraid of every shadow.

      • Isabella Martin

        By God’s grace, we dodged the hate bullet in the last election. It would have been a different story here if old hateful Harper got in. (I respectfully referred to him as “Pudge”)

      • handyhippie65

        ‘member when we used to be the land of the free, and the home of the brave?

    • Up In Smoke O’hontas

      We are an embarrassment. It is shameful.

      • Isabella Martin

        Shameful and embarrassing for sure, my sympathy. It is not a reflection on what real Americans are like though.

    • Alternative Pony Ron

      Well said. It’s an aberration, and with work it can and will be repaired. Soon, I hope.

  • fawkedifiknow

    One of – if not – your best.

    As long as there are Wonkettes, we have hope.

  • Resistance Fighter Astraea

    Dr Who also stole LeGuin’s story and made the child a giant space whale, but no one could walk away.

    • Wild Cat

      Omeros?

    • BTW mutterings are that Tilda Swinton will be the next Doctor

      • Shan McStroppyPants

        *muffled squee*

      • eggsacklywright

        She is a wonder.

      • House0fTheBlueLights

        yaaaaaassssss

      • Royal Ugly Dude

        I read Olivia Coleman had the inside track.

      • sincarne

        Please please please a thousand times please be true.

  • Wellstone En Resistencia, Coño

    Cruelty is a sign of strength, patriotism and of being a good Christian. I want nothing to do with those motherfuckers. They can all go fuck themselves.

    • Incoming (AKA Large) Ham

      If you believe their hooey and read the bible, they are not the sheep, they are the goats.

      Matthew 25:31-46

      It’s pretty fucking clear. They don’t care.

    • Idiokraticdrumpfenjugend

      So, I take it you will be one of those leaving Omelas?

  • Sedagive ’em Hell

    Thanks Doc.

    I watched the video. It really drives everything home.

    This is why we fight.

  • Me not sure

    “Joe” Trudeau stands ready to welcome them with open arms.

    • Alternative Pony Ron

      There was some consternation over what to do, when the first American refugees crossed into Canada (‘American refugees.’ This is not a phrase anyone would have written three months ago) but they are being allowed to stay while their status is determined. I don’t see them being sent back, though.

  • JohnBull

    The mind of a conservative: “We don’t want them here! We’re the greatest country in the world! Why don’t they want to come here?”

  • Jeffocaster in the desert

    I could do with a dose of LeGuin’s “effective dreaming” from the Lathe of Heaven. I dreamt last night Clinton was President…..

  • Proud Liberal

    America’s self-inflicted wound will never heal.

    • Claire

      Not in any of our lifetimes. Our trade partners are headed to China and Europe; the rest of the world is moving on to technology that’s not dependent on fossil fuels and leaving us behind; we have an unskilled, uneducated workforce and won’t be able to attract immigrants to take up the slack; Europe’s talking about military and economic self-sufficiency, which means we’ll have the world’s most bloated military and nowhere to send it except the Middle East, if there.

      Thanks, Trump voters.

      • Bill Diaz

        Dont forget to thank the ‘Bernie Bros’. Sen Sanders is one of the biggest hypocrites in politics and it is mind boggling to me that so many people were stupid enough to be suck into his BS.

        Have a great day!

        • Boscoe

          ROFL how’s that koolaid taste Bill?

          • Bill Diaz

            If you are referring to the ‘Jonestown Massacre’, the drink in question was ‘Flavor Aide’. If you are just a pinhead with insufficient intellect or snark to engage in a battle of wits, than I bid you good day sir.

            Have a great day!

    • sincarne

      I dunno. I think you guys can fix this. You’ve always been a country with a lot of smart, capable people, many of whom have *actual* big hearts. America may be a really different place soon, and maybe your role on the world stage will be really different, but I think you’ll heal.

  • Doug Langley

    Is Disqusting blowing a fuse? I just got kicked out of replying to a comment which says got yanked by the moderator. The comment was asking if comments were vanishing.

    • Shan McStroppyPants

      If the OP is editing their own comment, Disqus tells a replying poster the comment was deleted. Try later to see if they’re done editing.

      • Zippy W Pinhead

        I occasionally inadvertently do that to people replying to me because I’m constantly fixing typos from my awful typing.

        • laughingnome

          I fix my tyupsos too all the tiem.

          • natoslug

            Betsy Devos, is that you?

        • Bitter Scribe

          Same here. Or just because I’m a fussy Freddy who has to change this or that word.

    • Oblios_Cap

      That’s pretty Twilight Zone-ish!

    • Thaumaturgist

      Nah. Comments aren’t vanishing. It’s personal. Disqus hates you. Disqus is cool with the rest of us.

      • Incoming (AKA Large) Ham

        We get invited to all its slumber parties and make bracelets together.

        You aren’t invited.

    • Alan

      It’s only you. Creepy, eh?

    • natoslug

      If comments were allowed here, that might be a concern.

    • doktorzoom

      For reasons I don’t understand, that “comment removed by moderator” thing is Disqus’s default message whenever you try to reply to a comment that is no longer there, even if it was deleted by the user, not the mods.

    • azeyote

      maybe that was the answer to your question

  • Pierre_de_Fermat

    Thanks Dok.

  • Zippy W Pinhead
  • And the irony is that a lot of the prejudice against LGBTQ folks is assisted by the supposed Christians here in the US. As you may recall some of them publicly supported the death penalty laws for homosexuality in 12 different African nations.

  • Bill Diaz

    Im a US (disabled) combat vet and hear that bullshit ‘Thank you for your service’ nonsense 20+ time a day, because of my VFW hat. I am the chaplain of my post and was interviewed on TV this last year for the obligatory ‘Veteran’s Day’ piece.

    I am ~$300 in car repairs away from being a refugee to Canada myself, for medical (among other) reasons. Because I am both dying and can afford $1000k in insurance, my future wife (who hates me and doesnt know whats in store for her) will be well taken care of in the event of my demise (including my military death and pension benefits).

    This is not the country I served and still love. Even as the of pain.border vanishes behind me, feeling this way about America hurts me more than anything else in a lifetime that has otherwise been a thesaurus.

    ‘I tremble for my nation, when I reflect on the fact that God is just.’ -Thomas Jefferson

    Have a great day!

    • Beanz&Berryz

      Thank you for your thoughts and for teaching me the Jefferson quote. Oh my.

    • handyhippie65

      hang tough, bill. if you lived closer to me here in northeastern indiana, i would fix your car for the cost of parts. we gotta stick together.

  • Alan

    Dok has more patience than do I. If I thought they would let me stay I would walk to Canada.

  • Resistance Fighter Callyson

    Again:

    And I’m sad to be an American
    Where I thought we were all free
    And I won’t forget the troops who tried
    To give that right to me

    And I gladly stand up
    Next to you and resist Trump still today
    Cause there ain’t no doubt I love this land
    God help the USA

    • Courser_Resistance

      Nice!

  • proudgrampa
    • OrdinaryJoe

      New day, same shit. Sigh.

    • frrolfe

      That version has always reduced me to tears. What price fruit and veg. FFS

  • azeyote

    they’re paving the way for the rest of us –

  • Bitter Scribe

    Dear God, that video was absolutely heartbreaking.

    I was all set to write that this is the first time Canada has served as a refuge from the United States since the days of slavery. Then I remembered the Vietnam War. Is Canada going to have to clean up our messes every generation or so?

    American exceptionalism my ass.

    • Courser_Resistance

      Apparently.

    • Boscoe

      We are exceptionally shitty.

    • Charon_69

      it goes back to our respective foundings; we took in ‘Loyalists’ after 1776 and again around 1812; the underground railroad after that, Vietnam and now Trumpnam…the irony being we kept a Monarch who we turned into a figurehead while you guys seem determined to turn figureheads into royalty
      -love always,
      Canada

      • JustDon’tSayDieInJail

        All I can say is Ouch.

      • Bitter Scribe

        Figureheads or fuckheads.

      • handyhippie65

        i would say something about kicking us when we’re down, but i afraid i agree with you, and think we need a few more boots to the head.

    • handyhippie65

      it is canadian exceptionalism that we can count on. murika is just the exception.

  • Scrofula

    Dok–first thing I thought was a Christian allegory. I mean, the difference being Jesus (sort of) chose to suffer.

    Anyway, this stuff is a lot worse–we inflict pain and suffering on so many (or ignore it) solely to allow a political party a shot at a selfish agenda.

    • Beanz&Berryz

      or maybe too an agenda of selfishness

    • LucindathePook

      Jesus at least knew what was going on, and he did have hope, in that he knew his suffering was finite and would end and that after than he would be back to being god.

  • Courser_Resistance

    I’m glad to see some of the resources I work with have called out ‘sick’. Many of them are immigrants to the US or on HB1 visas.

  • C4TWOMAN

    “the only way you can claim refugee status in Canada is if you sneak in.”

    Does this work for US citizens? Asking for a friend.

  • sorbs

    American exportionalism. We’re #1 (but only in our sad, stupid, little minds)

  • Granny Sprinkles

    Dammit.

  • Beanz&Berryz

    Staying and fighting to make this a better place…

    That is the issue… how to do that… reason seems not to work… some sort of emotion, but I’m not clear what emotional line can pull some folks back from the Dark Side…

    And, those of us in places that have a strong consensus toward making things better, how do we bridge the gap of… perspective.. with those in places where the consensus is to do the opposite of what we think.

    I used to believe that, even between these different places, there was more that we shared in common than in what we differed over… but.. it feels like we’re at a place where… we in our places are more hated than Putin’s Russia… there’s not much shared consensus in that context.

    • Bill Diaz

      I am a fighter, from the top of my beret to the tips of my manicured (with nail polish to boot) toes. People talk ‘resistance’ and ‘fighting’, but their only real experience is running their mouths.

      I had (and still have) a brilliant plan, but will probably have to execute it myself and only if I survive my current ordeal. As a resident of Vermont, it is my fear that a great deal of the lassitude of the left comes from one of its icons, Bernie Sanders.

      He too has spent a lifetime running his mouth and doing nothing and if I survive, it is my hope to challenge him for his Senate seat in 2018.

      Dont laugh, we have Trump for President…

      Have a great day!

      • lroom

        You’d have my vote if I lived up there.

      • Beanz&Berryz

        But… How do we fight to change people’s minds? Especially people who hold their opinions dearly?

      • Grrrr…

        I used to work for a legis-tracking service, and my perspective on Sanders is very different. Can you tell me why you think he has merely run his mouth (which implies that he hasn’t passed laws or implemented programs or actually changed people’s lives in any way)? I’m not being snotty — I’m truly curious. Thanks.

        • Bill Diaz

          Ok, to start with, we need to go the ’80’s to his campaign for mayor and his pledge of ‘Affordable Housing’. He claimed he had a stick and the carrot he planned to bring to the table was development rights for the Burlington Waterfront.

          End Result: Billions in developer profits, 0 affordable housing units built.

          Time as Congressman: No sponsored legislation, no influence with peers, otherwise ineffectual. Served as a houseplant during Sec Clinton’s roll-out of universal healthcare.

          ” Senator: Sold out for the F-35, despite strong opposition inn the state to save a paltry handful of jobs at a factory making the ill fated gun. Screwed up the airport and surrounding community. As someone who once lived in the flightpath, I dont envy current residents.

          Presidential Campaign: Free tuition when he represents a state where in-state residents cannot attend (most expensive public university in the US), he talked about marijuana legalization while providing NO leadership on the

          issue in over 30 years in elected office and lastly tried to steal Sec Clinton’s issue of universal healthcare while conveniently forgetting to mention that even ‘The People’s Republic of Vermont’ couldnt pull it off.

          Moving on to his slimy home life, allow me to introduce his felonious wife and his scummy daughter. His daughter collected over $150k in 2 years teaching (part time!) a class on ‘furniture making’ that never had more than 6 students, at a time when the school in question had ~150 students and her mother was President (of Burlington College). You can look up the multiple violations of campaign law his wife and step-daughter committed, because they are a matter of record. You can also look up her fraudulent bond issue application that stated $2.1 million in expected donations to the school over the next 2 years, when the actual number was less than $65k. To protect the junior Senator’s wife from prosecution, a local bank had to eat the bond issue and retender it as a ‘single subscriber’ bond (not underwritten by the state), again eaten by the bank. As a final consequence, the last piece of undeveloped waterfront property in Burlington went to a slimy developer for pennies (20 cents) on the dollar, far below its nominal value, the developer acting as a ‘white knight’ to ‘save’ Burlington from Mrs Sander’s shitty judgement (the board fired her shortly after the details of the loan and land deal were revealed).

          That didnt save Burlington College though, they went under this year. Did I mention the $250k ‘severance payment that amounted to more than $1000 dollars for every student that attended the college during her tenure as President?

          The Piece de Resistance I save for last. On July 1st, 2011, I was a fully funded NIH extramural fellow with a grant to study diabetes as a PI. By September, I was unemployed, homeless, crippled AND divorced. As a combat veteran of the US Army, I thought there was help for me and that Bernie was all about us vets.

          He did NOTHING for me and I went homeless. When the VA finally did step in, grant me a disability pension (for having been paralyzed in combat +TBI) and put me in transitional housing for homeless vets, it wasnt because of anything that lying, hypocritical scumbag did.

          I despise that man with a passion that can scarcely be explained nor described and if I am alive come election time, will challenge him for office and destroy him politically if possible.

          Have a great day!

  • WomanInThePersistence

    I thought my heart could not be more hurt. I was wrong.

    • I am wondering if the resistance can’t organize an underground railroad. I am not even joking at this point.
      We need border living fighters and those along the routes

  • Thanks Dok and everyone for their thoughts on this. Canada will keeps on helping

    • sincarne

      Along those lines, I hope any other Canadians on this site will join me in writing to their MPs, asking them to get rid of the Safe Third Country agreement until this gets fixed.

  • mailman27

    26 people in one night. When it’s -17 degrees.

    • DrBigHead

      I was born and raised a short distance from the US -Canada border. Until you actually experience -17 degrees, you have no idea….

      • zerosumgame0005

        I lived in St. Cloud for a long time (9 years, for me a long time!) and now live in CA where people think it’s “cold” when it’s in the 30’s outside!!!! the very few times it gets that far down

      • JustDon’tSayDieInJail

        Scraping the _inside_ of my windshield, sitting on a car seat with foam frozen solid. But at least I was in a car and back indoors in a half hour or so. No way would I spend a whole night in that.
        Reason #1 (and maybe 2-5 as well) why I don’t miss South Dakota.

  • zerosumgame0005

    FYI the reason I don’t watch many videos is that it eats up the pathetic amount of data I get from fuckDISHTV, slow and just a dribble of data available. come on ATT pull some fucking FIBER out here! FYI DISH sucks ass!

  • DrBigHead

    Its been decades since I read LeGuin. The Omelas story disturbed me perhaps more than any piece of fiction I had ever read. I hadn’t thought about it in years. Thanks, Dok. I think……

  • AJ Milne

    America, just so you fully appreciate where this has gone, let’s reiterate. Not only are people fleeing your country…

    They’re fleeing to Manitoba.

    (I know. Actually serious. And miserable. Saw it, too; it’s been pretty big in the news up here. But our constitution is clear on this: Manitoba jokes are _mandatory_.)

    And more seriously still: I expect somewhere in the assembled links or comments it’s been noted, but this can be a very painful, dangerous way to cross. A Ghanian who crossed in December lost _all_ his fingers to frostbite.

    • phoenix00

      Not to mention the mosquitoes. Oh gods the mosquitoes.

  • Khavrinen

    Reposting, because this is a more appropriate spot than the first one I commented under–Ursula LeGuin puts the smack-down on someone claiming “alternative facts” are no different than science fiction:
    http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2017/02/ursula_leguin_on_fiction_vs_al.html

  • Zyxomma

    Okay, now I’m sad. Time to turn that into action.

  • Resistance Fighter MausFeet

    Dammit Dok, I JUST got fed up and offered myself up in servitude for citizenship elsewhere and now I’m pissed and ready to fight again.

    Thank you.

  • Pookabun

    I’d walk away, if I’m honest. The fight is the right thing and I do it because I’m here and an American so it’s my duty. However, if I had the opportunity, I’d be gone. I wasn’t born in the US and at this point, I’d be happy enough not to die here.

  • Yr. Gma

    Thanks for being my teacher, Dok.

  • Terpsichord

    Dok, I have refused to weep, preferring to keep my anger level up enough to fight. But this finally opened the floodgates.

    • MariaTheresa

      Is anyone interested in upholding laws. There was a legal reason why people’s asylum request was denied.Did any one of the people walking to Canada fought in their country, killed people,taken part in criminal activity or were actually persecuted?. It seems that Canada does not abide by its own laws because they should not accept anyone rejected by US Immigration. This opens the possibility of thousands of illegal migrants walking to Canada; Canada seems to be a lawless nation. I think citizens of the US should support of the people who diligently process application of foreigners who want to live in the US in hope that 9/11 and Boston could be avoided. Canada should smarten up and enforce laws because the same people who walked to Manitoba may walk back to US and kill more of innocent civilians

      • Jason

        Mother Theresa you ain’t. From this Manitoban to you, shut the fuck up. You don’t know what you’re talking about. Upholding laws…

      • JustDon’tSayDieInJail

        Downfisted, and I never downvote.
        Also:
        HI!
        Fuck off.

        • Tiny kaiju

          Thank you for reminding me we can do that. It’s too bad you can’t see negative numbers like you could in the old system.

          • JustDon’tSayDieInJail

            It’s the little things. Telling her to fuck off was more satisfying, though.

      • maggiemoo

        Are you afraid or are you ignorant?

        • MC Planck

          Why not both?

      • Tiny kaiju

        Did someone miss the motherfucking point here? That would be a resounding yes.

      • Tiny kaiju

        How very nice of you to declare Canada lawless without, I assume, ever setting foot there. Or knowing life in a country at war, or persecution because of your race, religion sexual orientation or gender.

        • MariaTheresa

          I am Canadian, have traveled the country form coast to coast. I have participated in politics an worked on laws that were enacted by parliament. I am a firm believer in the Charter of Rights. I am also a firm believer of upholding our laws and if they are no longer applicable, change them through democratic means.

          You must have missed the point of my reply. Th US as well as its laws should be respected and not shun because of jealousy or ignorance.

          • Tiny kaiju

            Your point being that you are a scold who distrusts all immigrants everywhere and you feel you can enlighten the rest of us by displaying the compassion and understanding of a dead moose. I looked at your Disqus history and your rather curious email address stump of mbur9ther. Call me a conspiracy theorist, but that sounds an awful lot like “birther” to me. Go concern troll on a less emotionally moving post please.
            Also reread, if you read it at all before, paragraphs about the Ursula LeGuin short story. If you can not see the connection between migrants fleeing misery and our desire to keep them miserable so we can pretend it makes us safe, and this story, then you are cold hearted and maybe a bit thick.

      • Dazza

        Maria, Canada has a very stringent program for screening refugees. To be a refugee is NOT illegal – such a status has a legal meaning and is recognised in Canadian law. A refugee is someone seeking protection in Canada from their home country (where they are at risk of serious harm or death and are displaced or persecuted). Imagine if you were a religious minority person, fleeing the civil war in your country, alone and frightened – how would you feel if people saw you abandoned and freezing, but passed you by? The law in Canada reads:

        Section 3(2) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act
        stipulates the following objectives of the Act in respect to refugees:

        (a) to recognize that the refugee
        program is in the first instance about saving lives and offering
        protection to the displaced and persecuted;

        (b) to fulfil Canada’s international
        legal obligations with respect to refugees and affirm Canada’s
        commitment to international efforts to provide assistance to those in
        need of resettlement;

        (c) to grant, as a fundamental
        expression of Canada’s humanitarian ideals, fair consideration to those
        who come to Canada claiming persecution;

        (d) to offer safe haven to persons
        with a well-founded fear of persecution based on race, religion,
        nationality, political opinion or membership in a particular social
        group, as well as those at risk of torture or cruel and unusual
        treatment or punishment;

        (e) to establish fair and efficient
        procedures that will maintain the integrity of the Canadian refugee
        protection system, while upholding Canada’s respect for the human
        rights and fundamental freedoms of all human beings;

        (f) to support the self-sufficiency
        and the social and economic well-being of refugees by facilitating
        reunification with their family members in Canada;

        (g) to protect the health and safety of Canadians and to maintain the security of Canadian society; and

        (h) to promote international justice
        and security by denying access to Canadian territory to persons,
        including refugee claimants, who are security risks or serious
        criminals.

        • MariaTheresa

          Is that the same law that Canada signed with the UN re: refugees. I do not think the Refugee protections laws imply if you are rejected in one country try another one (there are over 170 different nations). The US is a safe country.

          • Dazza

            Maria, I cited Section 3(2) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, a Canadian law – passed by the Canadian Parliament and given Royal Assent. It is, therefore, a Canadian law. That is what we should focus on.

            I would like to point out that the refugees discussed in the Wonkette article have been granted official refugee status by Canadian courts. Your individual opinion on the relative safety of the United States for the refugees is irrelevant to the proper enforcement and interpretation of the law.

            You claim to be Canadian in your comment history, but are you an ‘unlawful Canadian’ – that is, do you willfully flout Canadian laws you disagree with, for example, abiding by the Criminal Code and refraining from rape, murder and theft? As a citizen, your are protected by laws – but you must also abide by them. You cannot legally steal your neighbour’s car just because you like it – and he cannot legally assault you in retaliation. We agree as citizens to abide by common laws – to get the peace, order and good government referred to in the introductory part of the 1867 Constitution Act – which you cited in a previous post (indeed, this phrase has undergone many changes of interpretation in the courts since Confederation).

          • MariaTheresa

            I realize that Canadian law applies in our land. However, if a murdered crosses the country, do we respect the verdict of the US courts if criminal was given a life sentence. The reciprocity of respect of laws of other nations can work both ways. If we start to pick and choose, this will end up in chaos. By the way, I am not here illegally, respected all laws and had only one parking ticket which I paid.,

          • MariaTheresa

            I feel for the refugees who cross from US. I feel more sympathy for our homeless people on the streets of Vancouver. I also care that the danger pay was cut for our soldiers in harms way because of budget cuts. To process an asylum claim takes a long time. It is also costly, lawyers, appeals, etc. The taxpayers always lose. Is the government duty “also” to care for the less fortunate citizens of the country. Tax dollars should not heavily invested in processing asylum claims that have been denied by a legitimate US government.

          • Dazza

            Health care costs far more than processing refugees. Should health care be cut to save taxpayers money?

          • MariaTheresa

            Medicare is paid for by the Canadian tax payers. It is strange that you are willing to spend your tax dollars on re-adjudicating cases that have gone through the process in the US. I guess you do not give credit to those who work in the US immigration department. I believe that the asylum laws are uniform across the globe..

          • MariaTheresa

            You may find it hard to believe that in 1969 the medical coverage part of medicare actually made a profit. Later on the government combined hospital coverage (which was separate) with medical coverage, the plan worked with a deficit. Today, not all provinces cover the total medical insurance from general revenue, in BC, people pay premiums. There is a difference when you pay your way whether the medicare should be cancelled. I am sure, that to re-process a refugee from the US, probably cost more than an average person’s cost of medical services.

          • Dazza

            None of the refugees are murderers.
            Why are you insisting that they are?

            Produce proof – legally verifiable proof – of this claim before it can be taken seriously. If you don’t have proof you are slandering innocent people.

            The point I was making about law is not that YOU are guilty of a criminal act – but that the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act is the law. And since it is the law, refugees are entitled to claim the protection of that act once on Canadian soil.

      • phoenix00

        As a British Columbian, Canadian AND immigrant:

        http://i.memecaptain.com/gend_images/MT0JxQ.jpg

      • Grrrr…

        You ask “Is anyone interested in upholding laws,” as if any human-made laws are immutable. Laws change all the time, to reflect the changing needs of societies and, if we’re lucky/wise, to reflect our growing humane-ness. And what could be a more pressing need — what is more likely to prompt a speedy change in laws — than the suffering of refugees?

  • Celtic_Gnome

    Well said, Dok. I want to take your lit class now.

    No snark here. That was some serious truth telling, and you don’t snark the truth.

  • The Librarian

    My country tis of thee
    Sad land of bigotry……

    • Sakonyachen

      Of fear I sing….

  • Tiny kaiju

    Ursula LeGuin is my favorite writer. Ever since I first read her short stories when I was in junior high, I loved her compassionate character development and anthropological world building. This story always bothered me in that I cry for that child and hope I would have the strength to be one of the ones to walk away.
    Not entirely OT but at the beginning of The Dispossessed LeGuin wrote that it was a story about one of the ones that walked away from the Omelas.

  • Christina

    Wow that was an incredibly powerful story. It’s one of those stories, the best short stories, that afterwards you feel like you’ve just been told something that is too tremendous and terrible and real, that you can’t even comprehend. Like you just looked, without warning, into the abyss…. It feels like I should have some profound insight about what I just read, but I really don’t. The story itself says all that needs to be said. I’m glad I got to read it and Le Guin is certainly a captivating writer that I had no idea about. Thanks

    • MC Planck

      I recommend “The Lathe of Heaven.” Deep and yet still accessible.

      Also of course the Earthsea trilogy.

  • Lefty Wright

    I have not read the story, but assuming that there is in fact a basis for the mistreatment of the child and all the benefits the city enjoys depends on that suffering, it is completely different than the situation in the US. Here, people have been told that line but there is no basis in fact for that to happen. We are a country of over 320 million people, we are the richest nation ever on earth. We should not be afraid of sharing some of our bounty, especially for people that face extreme hardship and even brutal death in their homeland. Believing that the suffering of a family displaced from Syria, abandoning the home that their family has lived in for generations, all their possession except what they can carry on their backs, all their friends, relations and essentially their identity should suffer more at our hands lest we lose something that doesn’t really exist is evil. One person suffering for the real benefit of millions of people may be wrong but at least somewhat understandable. Humanity has a long history of rejecting people with diseases that could decimate an entire country, so permitting suffering of the few for the clear benefit of the masses is nothing new. Allowing thousands of innocent people to suffer due to a totally imagined danger in a supposedly educated, allegedly christian nation is sinful.

    • MC Planck

      It’s a philosophical point. Le Guin is pointing out that the only moral decision is to walk away. No one can free the child and unilaterally destroy the happiness of millions of others; but neither can one accept life on such terrible terms.

      Except, of course, we do; tragedy, pain, and death are among the gifts we give every child we bring into the world. And yet we keep bringing them.

  • Paperless Tiger

    We’re terrified of people fleeing (our) war (for their oil).

  • handyhippie65

    way to crush my soul, there dok. sorry, i know you didn’t do it. it was 23% of the american population who voted that did. it was the “president” they elected. it was the +50% of the population who didn’t even bother to vote. will we ever get our country back?

  • LadyLaz

    Ursula LeGuin is amazing

    • MC Planck

      You know Omelas is just Salem, O(regon) spelled backwards, right?

      One of the most profound short stories ever.

      • LadyLaz

        Now I do. Lol

  • Cismontane

    Wasn’t this a key moment in Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, where the heroine recalls almost making it to the Canadian border with her hubby, before border guards killed him and turned her into a sex slave? Nooooo!

  • pixeloid

    “we are now a country a lot of people have decided they must flee.”

    I’m sure this news will have tRump’s brownshirts dancing in the streets.

  • phoenix00
    • DeliaJones

      I’ve got two spare bedrooms as long as you’re not allergic to cattes

      • phoenix00

        I’ve got one bedroom and a den just outside Vancouver. No pets though.

  • sweeper

    Only just now read this beautiful piece. Increased my monthly donation in honor of it. Give money whenever Wonkette makes you cry, inspires you to greater action enlightens you. Sometimes with dick jokes, sometimes even without.

  • Espadron

    A fine bit of blogging. Worthy of $$$. I also add that NPR did a piece on the same subject with pics of dangerous refugees being helped through the snowy ditch by those weird Canadian cops.
    http://www.npr.org/2017/02/17/515662976/migrants-choose-arrest-in-canada-over-staying-in-the-u-s

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