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Howdy-doo, folks! Welcome back to your Snake Oil Bulletin, the weekly round-up of pseudoscience, nonsense, and assorted quackery this side of the Mississippi. It’s been a pretty painful week so far, but with the weekend comes good news that far worse off than you are all the anti-vaccine autism-exploiters out there. Let’s read on and feel the warmth of schadenfreude wash over us all, shall we?

Oregon Senate Makes Lying Liar Andrew Wakefield So Sad

Let’s start off our bulletin with some excellent news: Andy Wakefield is sad! Hurray! And he’s sad because a state legislature disinvited him from their super fun vaccine party.

For those new to the internet, Andrew “Andy” Wakefield is the asshole who started the modern anti-vaccination movement. As we’ve seen before, anti-vaccination views are hardly a recent phenomenon: people have been irrationally scared of needles and the bovine bestiality they induce since time immemorial. Yet it’s Andy whom you can thank for today’s current batch of fear-induced nonsense, namely the unkillable meme that vaccines cause autism. Andy was the scientist who authored the original 1998 paper in the Lancet journal that linked the Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) vaccine to autism development, starting the Jenny McCarthy bunch on their crusade against the single greatest medical advancement since cavemen figured out fire hurt.

Andy was a darling among the science-averse crowd, but the rest of the medical community smelled something fishy about his study when not a single scientist who followed his method could replicate his results. Andy eventually had his medical license revoked and his paper formally retracted by the journal after it was discovered that his “study” was as fishy as a wharf at high tide:

According to the BBC, among his alleged acts of misconduct were conducting those studies without ethical approval of the hospital at which he practiced, and paying children at his son’s birthday party for blood samples. He also served as a paid consultant to attorneys of parents who believed their children had been harmed by vaccines.

There’s also the small matter that he faked a lot of his numbers and the timelines of the children’s medical records to make it look like there was a causal link between MMR and autism, including one child who somehow developed autism from the MMR before he’d even received the MMR. We’re dealing with psychic vaccines here, people.

It’s a pretty damning list of frauds to be sure, but don’t let that laundry list of quackery deter the anti-vaxxers. To them Andy’s alleged crimes just mean he is the center of an elaborate, possibly multi-dimensional conspiracy committed to discrediting everyone who ever dared question the monolithic medical research establishment, what with its unlimited funds available for that sort of thing. Thus it’s little surprise that the anti-vaxxers still invite him to their fringe conferences and wackadoo lectures, like one at the Oregon Senate for example. Wait, what?

Yes indeed. Turns out Andy was placed on the list of witnesses for the Oregon Senate Committee On Health Care as they were considering a bill to make it harder for stupid concerned parents to get non-medical exemptions for their kids’ vaccines. A laundry list of cranks had already been asked to testify against the proposed bill, but the Oregon Chiropractic Association (we’ll get to chiropractic in another bulletin, fear not) decided that the best person to advance their anti-vaccination cause was the most famously discredited science fraud of the last twenty years.

Fortunately the Oregon Senate has at least a few members who are not A Idiot, and Wakefield’s scheduled testimony on the 9th was canceled by the committee’s chairwoman, who made the very judicious argument that Andy’s appearance wouldn’t be appropriate on a day reserved for legal testimony on the bill. Regardless of how she phrased it, kudos to Sen. Laurie Monnes Anderson for keeping at least most of the science testimony reserved to actual, non-fraud-committing scientists.

Italian Courts Rescind Earlier Anti-Vaccine Stupidity

Now we present another feel good story in the fight against autism-exploiting anti-vaccine assholes. An Italian court has thrown out an earlier ruling that the MMR vaccine led to autism in children.

Back in 2012, an Italian provincial court, bastion of medical science that it is, ruled that the MMR vaccine was responsible for causing autism in one Italian child, thus making the family eligible for victims’ compensation. While we here at your Wonkette are all faithful vanguards of the proletariat and in general very much in the “pro” column when it comes to people receiving compensation after being victimized by monolithic entities, this particular case was bull for a few reasons. For one, the court listened to only one expert, ignoring attempts to bring in conflicting testimony. For another, the single expert called in got all his information from Andy Wakefield’s debunked paper! Woah, who’da thunk that asshole would show up again?

Me. I thunk it. Because I write this crap.

The decision sent ripples throughout the antivaxxosphere (we are never spelling that word again), and had been used by the anti-vaxxers for years as evidence that yes huh vaccines are bad because look, a court said so! Fortunately it seems that court systems do indeed work, as the decision was bumped up the chain by the Italian Ministry of Health and has officially been rescinded by the Court of Appeals. The government’s expert witness argued that the original ruling lacked any real evidence for its decision and that no other study has ever shown a link between vaccines and autism — y’know, statements that are actually true. The judges agreed, and the original ruling was officially tossed out. We like to imagine that the judges adjourned the session by giving a multi-member Italian chin flick right in Andy Wakefield’s direction. That would have made the whole week just perfect.

All these happenings are very good news for the millions of autistic kids used as pawns by the anti-vaxxers in their campaign against science. Unfortunately, the anti-vaxxers aren’t the only ones who, upon seeing families desperate and suffering, hear cash registers go ka-ching.

Paleo Diet Wackadoo Says He Can Cure Autism

The latest food craze to hit bookshelves in the last few years is the Paleo Diet, a fad weight loss program which purports to resemble the meals consumed by our earliest ancestors, the working hypothesis being that such a diet is healthier for us. While most of the claims of paleo (for example, that human beings can’t digest bread, or that high-fat coconut oil will make you lose weight) are nonsense, the diet itself is mostly harmless and isn’t worth the time and energy to debunk that, say, bleach enemas do. If you want to cut bread and beer out of your diet, knock yourself out; it’d probably help you out, you chubby lush you. The problem from the diet comes when paleo advocates get so high off the smell of their own coconut-sweetened farts that they make outrageous claims like they can cure autism with food.

At least that’s the claim being made by Pete Evans, a teevee celebrity chef in Australia who wherever we see news articles about him, is inevitably described using such choice phrases as “paleo evangelism” or “downright fanaticism.” Oh, and he’s kind of a fluoride-fearing loon.

Evans believes that the modern diet is the cause of autism, and he’s attacked several reputable Australian health organizations for promoting nutritional guidelines that in his mind lead to increased levels of autism. He claims that eating low-fat foods and grains is what causes autism to develop in healthy children, even though children show signs of the condition as early as 6 months old, i.e. before they’re even eating solid foods. In other words, *cough*bullshit*cough*.

In true quack fashion, Evans has taken a tiny grain of truth and blown it up into, well, a 2100-word rant on Facebook. Professor Cheryl Dessanayake (an actual fucking autism researcher) points out that diet changes can help autistic children, but only in that they are often predisposed to particular stomach problems (evidence of a genetic link, bee tee dubs), and a more autistic-friendly diet can help alleviate gastrointestinal stress. It doesn’t “cure” their condition (and since it isn’t a damn disease, it can’t be cured to begin with), and there is exactly zero evidence that its onset or remission has anything to do with the food they eat.

Of course, it wasn’t just autism that Evans tried to exploit to get people to buy his paleo cookbooks, watch his paleo teevee show, or suck his paleo wiener. He also links low-fat foods and grains to an increase in just about every scary-sounding mental condition:

Why is the rate of mental illness including dementia and Alzheimer’s escalating at a frightening rate and we are told by the [Dietitians Association of Australia] and Heart Foundation to avoid saturated fat when this is what our brains need to survive and function properly. [sic]

The key to an A+ grift is to make it universal. Your panacea must be exactly that: a cure-all. Can paleo diet help you lose weight? Absolutely. Can it cure your family members’ autism, dementia, and Alzheimer’s? You bet. Will it bring you lasting happiness and wellness so long as you follow the strict dietary restrictions to the absolute letter? Buy my book and find out! This is Peter Evans wishing you good health, because God only knows you won’t get it from me.

Flotsam, Jetsam, and Hokum

Last on our round-up, we take a look at some of the finest in anti-intellectual property rights as reported by your favorite otherkin LiveJournal community, your Wonkette!

That’s all for this week. Tune in next week when your Volpe tries his hand at phrenology for the most vulnerable among us: rabid wolves. I’ve still got 7 good fingers left and they’re itchin’ to get goin’.

[Time / Science Blog / Science Blog / Skeptical Raptor / Skeptical Raptor / Essential Baby / Sceptical Nutritionist / Daily Telegraph]

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  • Beowoof14

    These guys are out there everyday, all over the net trying to sell the gullible their latest boner cure. And some guys will buy anything if they think it will make their average dick bigger.

    • weejee

      some guys will buy anything

      Perhaps they should try the economy route and go to Home Despot™, buy a couple of cinder blocks, and then hang them from it.

      • glasspusher

        That would make them a real Cinder-fella.

    • eggsacklywright

      I saw one of those boner infomercials the other day, with a lady boner doctor expert who said the product they were shilling was extra perfect and besides, she’s a doctor. I goggled her: she’s a doctor of divinity. hahahahahaha

      • Villago Delenda Est

        Well, praying for a bigger dick is probably every bit as effective as using whatever it is she was shilling, so there’s that.

    • Biel_ze_Bubba

      Waste of money; for most of these guys their problem is that they are huge dicks.

  • cousin itt

    Do you know who else is on the Paleo Diet? No? There is a reason.

    It’s because they are EXTINCT.

    • weejee

      Nooooo. There are still some furry RINOs.

  • Bill Slider

    The good news is, that if you get your vaxxes before fapping, you won’t get pimples.

    • weejee

      But still the hairy palms?

      • glasspusher

        I don’t have hairy anything, except the top of my head. I guess I take after my dad, who my mom nicknamed “The Hairless Wonder”

      • Bill Slider

        I did go blind, so I can’t see my palms. Nothings perfect.

  • Left Coast Tom

    If you want to cut bread and beer out of your diet, knock yourself out; it’d probably help you out, you chubby lush you.

    So you’re recommending I drink wine instead of beer? Got it.

    • Blank Ron

      It’s made from fruit, so = healthy.

  • weejee
  • Vienna Woods

    On the other hand, reputable scientists at a reputable university here in Ontario have been doing some interesting research on gut bacteria and autism. I heard an interview with one of them the other day on the CBC- interesting. http://www.lfpress.com/2013/01/28/researchers-discover-link-between-certain-types-of-autism-and-gut-bacteria

  • MrBlobfish

    Try the Blobfish Diet. Look what it’s done for me!

    • eggsacklywright

      Svelte. And fuckin’ suave, too.

    • cousin itt

      Ask me how to grow back hair by eating Wren’s livers and Jaguar’s earlobes from Whole Foods.

      • sw19womble

        You call that hair? pfthpthlrpp!!!! Try the Blancmange diet!

      • dlemex

        Which do they help you do? grow “back hair” or “grow back” hair? I am always looking to do one but not the other!

      • Biel_ze_Bubba

        I don’t need to grow it back . . . I just need to re-locate it back, to where it used to be.

    • Shibusa

      I can also recommend small, furry rodents. Yum.

    • Beaumarchais?

      Does the blobfish diet include a lot of tartar sauce?

      • MrBlobfish

        ISWYDT

      • Amy!

        Not sure, but I hear that a meal of fresh-caught whole pufferfish is guaranteed to end your diet problems!

  • glasspusher

    Me, I’m trying just to get to second base- and I’d steal it if she only gave the sign.

    • Spotts1701

      Just don’t get picked off.

      • glasspusher

        Who do I look like? Kolten Wong?

  • SnarkOff

    I want to live as long as Stone Age humans did–you know, the humans who routinely died of toothaches or infected wounds at the age of 13.

  • PubOption

    The Circa Paleo diet has not harmed Jenny’s abs. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IjaWJeFr19E

    • topjob66t

      Here in the North East we can’t have nice things like that until the ice and snow goes away. Excellent abs. Oh … good music too.

    • glasspusher

      I find this very easy to fap to

  • VirginiaLady

    Personally I prefer the cave bear diet.

    • Mehmeisterjr

      I dunno. The bear diet seems to include me as an entrée.

      • glasspusher

        Just remember to hike with someone who can’t run as fast as you. Problem solved.

        • Mehmeisterjr

          Where would I find such a person?

    • mailman27

      Darryl Hannah was the best part of that diet.

  • Ikimizi

    So, a few years back, I was eating at a popular but inexpensive restaurant (Okay, it was Burger King), when I noticed an older woman stealing glances, and quickly looking away. This continued for several minutes, and was really weirding me out. Until, finally, she got up the nerve to excitedly tell me that I looked just like one of the Geico cavemen. At which point she realized I might not view this as a compliment. The embarrassed look on her face just made the whole thing that much funnier. But, yes, my hair was pretty long at the time, and I did have a full beard, so if you’ve wondered what I look like, just imagine a sexier version of the guy in the picture at the top of this post.

    • sw19womble

      I’ll be in my bunk! ;p

      • Ikimizi

        Ah, that’s sweet. Thinking of you in your bunk thinking of me…excuse me, I’ll be right back…

    • Shibusa

      An old man at a South Carolina flea market told my (very pretty) sister that she was “about as pretty as a forty pound catfish”. He meant it as the purest of compliments. We cracked up.

  • topjob66t

    If I were to be a curmudgeon and I will be I’d say that a wharf smells worse at low tide.
    And Gary Null started that vaccine hokum back in the late 70’s. Don’t believe he was using autism in the argument but he definitely was saying mercury was an element in preserving viability in the portion. He is still defending his arguments to this very day. Gary is all about a holistic approach to health and is deeply fond of coffee … enemas.

    • zerosumgame0005

      this guy?

      1979: In the 1979-80, he
      co-authored a series of articles on cancer research for Penthouse,
      entitled The Politics of Cancer beginning with one entitled “The Great
      Cancer Fraud.”

      yeah, I only read it for the ARTICLES MA! I swear it!

      • topjob66t

        Could have been that guy. Null is one of those people who is right half the time but where he is wrong he is dangerously wrong.

  • A Bashful Nobody

    Chubby Lush,eh? I think I used to date her…………

    • Blank Ron

      I’m living with her sister Skinny.

      • glasspusher

        Is she a lightweight?

  • Callyson

    Why is the rate of mental illness including dementia and Alzheimer’s escalating at a frightening rate and we are told by the [Dietitians Association of Australia] and Heart Foundation to avoid saturated fat when this is what our brains need to survive and function properly.

    Or, maybe this can be explained by the fact that mental health care treatment has progressed as the science has developed?

  • Blank Ron

    I wanted to try the paleo diet but the grocery store never has megatherium in stock.

  • El Cid

    I tried the Paleo Diet but unfortunately I chose a less successful paleolithic group where the game they hunted had decreased due to drought and most of the collected plants were of low nutritive value, so I died out.

    • Jared James

      I tried the Paleo Diet, but like many of my fellows, I was infected with parasitic nematodes due to the necessity of supplementing protein in our diet with roaches and grasshoppers, and I died of uncontrollable fluid loss from my inflamed intestines before I was five years old.

      • ahughes798

        I tried the paleo diet for a while, but I was killed trying to run away from an enraged giant bison, on my legs that were stunted from improper nutrition in the womb. I was 25, though, so I was pretty old.

        • Biel_ze_Bubba

          You should have taken early retirement.
          Oh wait, that WAS how people got retired. Nevermind.

    • Msgr_Moment

      I had the same results with the Oregon Trail diet.

      • Guest

        I tried the Donner Party diet, tastes like chicken and never any shortage of ingredients.

  • SadDemInTex

    Isn’t the Paleo diet exactly the same as the Adkins diet?

    I find both sides of the vaccine issue disingenuous. Any drug (and a vaccine is a “drug”) has a percentage of people who are harmed by the drug. The pharmaceutical companies (just like Ford did with the Pinto) have to do a risk management assesment. Will the percentage of harm (say 3%) be so negligible compared to the good (97%) that the drug is “good”. (and that is assuming that the pharma company is altruistic and not just crunching $$$ numbers). In an ideal world the science community would be searching diligently for a test that would identify people who would be harmed by the drug in question instead of just denying that there is any harm involved. (A scratch test…a blood test??…is that asking too much?) I just keep remembering that doctor that said only 10% of the people who were allergic to penicillin reacted to the antibiotic she wanted me to take. It would have been so much better to have been able to do a quick scratch test instead of having an anaphylactic reaction. (

    • Shibusa

      It so easy to blame vaccines for everything…because you can control vaccines going into your kid’s body or not. You cannot control, say, various environmental exposures.

      • sw19womble

        Or your kids being pompous annoying twats because genetics.

        • zerosumgame0005

          was the Hilton boy vaccinated? would that mean anything if he was, or wasn’t? geez I ask weird questions don’t I?

    • topjob66t

      There is no known cause for autism. There is no known test to determine susceptibility. And it is autism that the anti vaxxers are clamoring about.
      You make a very good point about percentages of bad reactions to vaccination. And it has been proven time and again that vaccines do not cause autism.
      Autism is an irregularity formed in the brain structure. It is more likely to be an inherited genetically passed on disorder but not always the case.
      Call me crazy but ever since we started blowing up nuclear bombs in our atmosphere (testing 1 2 3) in the 1950’s all sorts of maladies began plaguing we humans. And just to put some icing on that cake we. the US, set off 250 explosions quickly before a universal ban was to take effect. We are so fucked up that way.

      • SadDemInTex

        Even the anti-vaxxers I know do not believe in the autism nonsense. They talk about injuries that are related to anaphylaxis….which, not surprisingly, include brain injuries. Sometimes it is just the because the airway becomes constricted cutting off oxygen and blood to the brain …to just the swelling of every tissue in the body with fluid which can include swelling of the brain cells. (I had major edema from my reaction to the penicillin related drug). And just as there is a percentage of children who die of the brain encephalitis from measles I suspect there is a correlation in percentage of the brain injuries from the measles vaccine. Anaphylaxis is based on the protein of the organism one is allergic to after all.

        What people forget is that if a family had a “different” child that child disappeared from the family…into institutions…attics…distant $$$$ relatives. The Kennedys are an example of this. Just about every prominant family everywhere has these hidden ancestors.

        • zerosumgame0005

          since almost all vaccines of the kind being discussed are done in a doctor or nurses presence with oxygen and at least an epi-pen in hand what is the issue?

          • Biel_ze_Bubba

            The issue is going home and THEN having the reaction. I suppose you could hang out in the doc’s waiting room until closing time.

          • zerosumgame0005

            so document how long it takes for an allergic reaction to ANY vaccine to happen

        • topjob66t

          Ya know what is freaking me out right now? Removal of cataracts in my eye balls. One at a time and I am petrified And I can’t show it.
          Forgive me for deviating from your post. I am mentally kinda scrambled at the moment.
          I appreciate how you spelled out that just about all families have a historical root and some are not savory.

          • Biel_ze_Bubba

            I had it done. The freakout factor is greatly reduced by the Valium they fill you with … it turns you into an interested spectator. (Absolutely zero pain, although I had a day of maddening itch after one of the two operations.)

            My first reaction on taking off the patch was, “Wow! Who turned on the lights?” Having one good eye and one fucked-up one makes for an interesting week – and a real appreciation of what the procedure does for you.

            Hope you have equally happy results!

          • topjob66t

            Thanks for the encouragement. I go under the poke Tuesday. I’ll let you know how it turned out. Again … thanks.

          • SadDemInTex

            May your eye surgeon be skilled, your recovery easy and complete and your sight be spectacular!

          • topjob66t

            Thank you. Wife will drive me to Bronx VA hospital tomorrow Tuesday. She hates the Bronx so I am going to be owing her big time.
            The hospital has upgraded all equipment since the revelations about poor services in DC. Everything is state of art now. So there is that to calm me down. Plus I spoke to 3 surgeons who all took part in evaluating me. And I shook hands with the Doctor who will work on me. What a grip that guy had.

          • bobbert

            This may not be much comfort, but I had one cataract done early 2014. You do some antibiotic drops for a couple of days prior (DO THIS), then pretty good drugs, the brightest light you have ever experienced, a faint whiff of burning cornea, and the next morning your vision is much better. There is no pain, which surprised me.

            Think carefully about how you want the replacement lenses focussed. Since I only had one done, it was easy for me to go for near-field — I read a lot.

            There is, of course, a small percentage of adverse results. (1) Be sure to follow the eyedrop instructions scrupulously. (2) The worst adverse result is losing sight in an eye. If you have cataracts bad enough to warrant surgery, you’re well on the way to losing sight in that eye, anyhow. It’s a pretty good bet.

          • topjob66t

            The cataract was deemed to be in the ‘blue’ zone by the surgeons. Not advanced but just right to remove and replace with lens. Other eye can continue with corrective lense because not that advanced.
            Had surgery yesterday and saw Doctor today. Examination showed everything went well. Given 3 different drops to reduce swelling prevent infection and I forget what the third is for (Can’t quite read that fine print yet :)
            I drew out a chart for times and will follow meticulously.
            Thanks for your comments,

        • Biel_ze_Bubba

          Those hidden-away family members are probably not “ancestors”.
          /nitpick

          My daughter has had impressive allergic reactions to several classes of drugs, but (knock on wood) so far nothing approaching anaphylaxis. I would bet that allergic reactions account for the vast majority of vaccine injuries. Usually it’s not the antigen, but something else in the witch’s brew that constitutes even a modern vaccine.

          • SadDemInTex

            What would you call a family member from 100 years ago who died childless in an institution (if you are not being specific like great great aunt)?

            And according to Virgina I’m a medical moron and everything in the vaccine is an antigen and you seem to use “witch’s brew” for my (apparently ignorant) word “serum” . And apprently my poor (and ignorant) choice of words makes my ideas/points nonsense. Yay, I’m an ignorant moron who spouts nonsense…it must be from the anaphylaxis!!!!

          • Biel_ze_Bubba

            Somebody needs a timeout.

          • SadDemInTex

            True…thanks, Biel

      • PubOption

        Interesting, my great aunt used to say something similar, but she claimed that rockets being shot into the atmosphere was the problem. I think she made this comment before dementia set in.

        • topjob66t

          Well your comment suggests that you are young. Way past the tests in the air and finally stopped in the ground.
          Anything else you would like to expand on this?

      • “ever since we started blowing up nuclear bombs in our atmosphere
        (testing 1 2 3) in the 1950’s all sorts of maladies began plaguing we
        humans.”

        HOLY SHIT NO MALADIES EVER PLAGUED US BEFORE THEN!!!

        • Msgr_Moment

          Thanks, Obama!

        • topjob66t

          Well we did used to get eaten a lot. That waned out fortunately. Then there were plagues and Crusades and disgruntled leaders who love blowing up shit. That seems to still be lingering. But we also have well over a 100 different classifications of cancer. That is so 20th and 21st century. You can thank Mr. Atom fucking bomb for that. Now get off my lawn!!

          • bobbert

            You can also thank vast progress in medical research diagnosing and analyzing cancers. Also, that our life expectancy has roughly doubled since the 19th century, so more people have chance to develop cancer.

      • Guest

        It’s not that new maladies began plaguing humans. It’s that maladies that existed in much smaller numbers increased. I’m inclined to think that increasing environmental pollution in the 50s and later has contributed to the increasing incidence of a wide variety of illnesses.

        • topjob66t

          You are correct. I find it quite amazing that we don’t read about the correlation. We can see mutations in crops today in the vicinity of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan. I mean grotesque anomalies in the plants.

      • Big Puppy

        It’s not that new maladies began plaguing humans. It’s that maladies that existed in much smaller numbers increased. I’m inclined to think that increasing environmental pollution in the 50s and later has contributed to the increasing incidence of a wide variety of illnesses.

      • malsperanza

        I agree that autism is most likely genetic, similar to Down syndrome. Strong correlation (not yet proven as causation) has been found between increase in number of children born to older fathers and increase in autism in that population.

        Environmental causes would likely affect other species (as increases in skin cancer are found in animals as well as humans, due to depleted ozone). No such brain irregularity has so far been found in other mammals.

        Cancer? Sure. But not autism.

        • Biel_ze_Bubba

          It’s a defect in high-level brain functions that animals pretty much don’t even have to start with. If we discover a physical defect, we might then be able to find it (or create it) in an animal model.

        • topjob66t

          So many smart people on this site! Cancer yes. Autism no. I think I got more responses on that post than ever before here. Well I did break some kind of record a few years back over at Political Wire but we wont go into details here.

    • Virginia Dreaming

      Vaccines are not drugs! A drug is a molecule that changes the activity of one or more of enzymes by binding to the active site or an allosteric site. A vaccine is a target antigen for the immune system. The immune system recognizes its target antigen and begins producing cells which secrete antibodies to the target antigen we injected. Later, even years later the immune system is able to mount its response much faster, thus making it much more difficult for an infection by bacteria or a virus with the target antigen on its surface to take hold. Those are not the same actions.

      • SadDemInTex

        Vaccines are not just the target antigen…they are contained in “serums”. I used the word drug because it was a general “word”. You are playing semantics…the reality is that people have “reactions” to vaccines….a percentage of these reactions are harmful. It is just sophistry to play the definition of a word game. My mother (in 1929) had an anaphylactic reaction to her “baby” shots…she had to have a radical tracheotomy. IT WAS NOT THE ANTIGEN…it was the serum. My grandmother had the same allergy and had an anaphylactic reaction (almost dying) to a tetnus vaccine…even though she and my mother (who was present) said she was allergic to the serum in the vaccine.

        • Virginia Dreaming

          The serum simply primes the immune system to react more strongly. Again, not a drug, although some components of the serum can also serve as antigens. Of course people have adverse reactions to vaccinations, that does not make them a drug. People have adverse reactions to bullets, those are not drugs either. When you use words to mean things they do not actually mean you don’t communicate, you just obfuscate.
          You can yell all you want, you mother did react to an antigen. It may not have been the intended antigen, but it was an antigen. Most of what you are saying has some merit, but your use of medical terminology is simply wrong, and that changes your meaning into nonsense.

          • SadDemInTex

            Your superior scientific knowledge about the correct definition of antigen does not trump my point. The denial of harm is the true beginning of this mess. Would it have been more correct to say that the measles antigen was not responsible for my mother’s reaction but that her allergy to the mixture of other proteins (horse, cow…whatever) that were used with the vaccine were the antigens at fault? Would it truly have made my point that much better and not “nonsense”? And thank you so much for your correction. Knowledge is a good….and the more accurate the better.

          • malsperanza

            “Your superior scientific knowledge about the correct definition of antigen does not trump my point.”

            Except yeah, it does.

            While all patients risk an adverse reaction to all treatments, that concept is inherent in the practice of medicine. It’s painfully disingenuous to claim that there has ever been a “denial of harm.” See also: Patients; doctors; asking questions of.

          • SadDemInTex

            Ok, mal, no pharmaceutical company or doctor has ever denied/used language that obfuscated about a procedure, drug, antigen, food that could possibly be harmful to a person, animal, or plant because that “concept of possible adverse reaction is inherent in the practice of medicine” and science and it is so obvious to every one who is sentient. Let us all sing the chorus “

          • Biel_ze_Bubba

            I don’t think there’s “serum” in any of today’s vaccines, aside from the few made with Vero cells. That being said, I’m surprised that manufacturers don’t do more processing to get the useless and potentially harmful gunk out of their vaccine concoctions. Maybe it’s too expensive – we can’t have vaccines priced like biotech drugs.

          • bobbert

            Excuse me, but throwing the Tuskegee syphilis experiment into a discussion of vaccination is utter bullshit.

      • zerosumgame0005

        vaccines are teases! they tease those poor immune systems! not enough dying poors!

    • glasspusher

      My dad liked strawberries…he’s dead. QED

      • andreamd

        My dad liked oranges- and he is dead too

        • glasspusher

          I don’t eat those either

          • Biel_ze_Bubba

            I blame the eggplant that he liked. Everything else he ate was perfectly safe.

      • Msgr_Moment

        My mom made us eat Brussel sprouts. I wondered if she’s meet your dad yet.

      • bobbert

        My dad liked pork chops, and he’s dead too.

    • FlownOver

      I prefer the Post-Monolith Paleo diet, heavy on tapir tartare.

    • Amy!

      complications from vaccines (yes, there are some) run at something less than a ten-thousandth of one percent.

      most of the diseases that vaccines treat had mortality (not “complications” here because once the rates are this high, you’re grateful to be alive) rates ranging from about 7% to 30%. unfortunately, this was measured in populations that did not or do not have access to modern medicine; we do not know what the rates would be in unvaccinated populations with access to modern medicine, as a rule. this is because, as a rule, modern medicine includes vaccines as one of its core tools (orange county may be our first exception … post-modern (anti-)medicine?).

      but yeah, sure, both sides. it’s terrible to contemplate the thousandths-of-a-percent possibility of complications when weighed against the percents of mortality facing live disease in the absence of herd immunity.

      wait, no, it isn’t. it’s completely stupid and not only self-defeating, but defeating herd immunity and protection for those who can’t be immunized.

      so much for both sides.

      • PunditusMaximus

        Depends on the vaccine; I’ve read possible complications as high as a hundredth of a percent, if you get past the “had a shitty night the first night” level.

    • Biel_ze_Bubba

      There is certainly a gimlet-eyed risk-benefit analysis. Which we have the FDA do, not the pharma company. Getting a vaccine approved is actually a such major pain in the ass that only a few companies bother to try.
      In view of the statistical certainty of a small number of serious adverse reactions, there’s also a federal fund from which payments are made to people injured by vaccines; it’s basically a no-fault insurance program for the pharma companies (who pay the necessary premiums):
      http://www.hrsa.gov/vaccinecompensation/index.html

  • Steverino247

    Paleo Diet. Hmm. It’s hard to gain weight when your life is that hard. When everybody had to walk out to their fields for a 12 hour day or swing a hammer on construction sites instead of pull triggers on pneumatic devices, there was less of a problem with weight. Also, high fructose corn syrup’s wide use since about 1984 didn’t help.

    • glasspusher

      Yeah, but my decision to stop drinking sodey pop in 1981 looks like genius now.

      • Steverino247

        Too bad there wasn’t some kind of stock option with that. You’d be a gazillionaire!

        • Biel_ze_Bubba

          Actually, the way to make the big bucks was to bet on the stupidity of almost everybody else.

          Just like today. *sigh*

    • nmmagyar

      Alzheimer’s and heart disease also weren’t big problems in folks with an average life expectancy of 35

    • I_Buttle

      Hmmm, I don’t know anything about Paleo Diets, but where i’m from, North America, life was pretty fucking good. Salmon, Buffalo, Elk, Deer, Berries, all manner of roots etc. So people were doing pretty good before they got their asses saved by civilization.

      • Biel_ze_Bubba

        And that’s why life expectancy was so high, back in the good ol’ paleo days.

    • PunditusMaximus

      That’s why diets like this tend to “work”, IMHO. Get rid of modern wheat varietals and HFCS, and you’ve done your body a huge favor. If you eat a crapload of fruits and veggies instead of honey-filled “granola” bars, so much the better.

  • glasspusher

    “Back in the old days we only ate organic, natural…Clouds! Stars! Rocks! We ate big things!”

    – Mel Brooks, Two Thousand and Thirteen

  • Enfant Terrible

    My daughter-in-law’s mom is an anti-vaxxer and we’ve had some heated debates on the Facey-Spacey. Thanksgiving should be interesting this year! If there is a silver lining, it’s that she has cited a wide range of crap pots and junk scientists as authorities. It’s like she’s doing my oppo research for me.

  • Donna Rail

    Look, my booster shots hurt too, but that was the only evil thing about them. Oh, and I nearly died of mumps the year before I got the MMR shot.

    • andreamd

      and I had a reddish swelling for 4 days at the site of my shingles shot- so much worse than actual shingles. Actually, the shingles photos I have seen make me think of plague

      • Mehmeisterjr

        Back in the day, I had the brand new Salk polio shot. It hurt. A few years later, I got the Sabin vaccine and I could have choked on that sugar cube! Obviously, a full-blown case of polio would have been the better choice in the long haul.

  • gomerel

    Same b.s. comments about Paleo you find in the regular drivel press. Mostly setting up a straw man that has little resemblance to current Paleo.

    Yes, the people who started the movement thought “Hey, we should eat like cavemen and women!” There are still d*ickheads following the program who take that approach. Nearly all of us have moved on. We discovered that we can’t eat like cavemen. Duh! The foods mostly don’t exist. We can learn from what we know about they, and our ancestors up to around when we started eating crap (1900? 1950?), ate and how they lived.

    There are Paleo (Ancestral) scientific conferences at little, oddball universities like, oh, UCLA, Harvard, UC Berkeley. I went to one last year at UC Berkeley. Six of the speakers are professors at major university med schools.

    I am self-diagnosed as having had border-line autism for most of my 72 years. (Oh, my god! Self-diagnosed. No official stamp of approval from someone in the pocket of Big Pharm. Oh, no!) Going to a flexible version of Paleo (the Primal Blueprint) has improved every aspect of my health, including “autism-like” symptoms.

    Paleo is not like Atkins. Some Paleo followers do well on lots of carbs, preferably not grains but that is not rigid.

    Saying that everyone up to the 20th century died in their 30s is bullshit lying with statistics.

    Not everyone worked “really, really hard” in the past. Paleolithic hunters and gatherers did not. Neither did all our great grandparents. Working or working out really, really hard is not at all necessary for health. Being physically active is necessary.

    I love Wonkette and post links to it in Facebook pretty much daily. Too bad you don’t have the same open minds about alternative health that you have about politics.

    • I must have missed the day when “open minded” means “accepting any hippie I-want-to-believe nonsense as science fact”. The deliberate brain-death which on the Right leads to fundamentalism and creationism leads, on the Left, to diet fads and “alternative medicine”.

      • gomerel

        You might have skimmed over the part where I said there are annual scientific conferences about Paleo (aka ancestral health) at places like UCLA, Harvard and UC Berkeley.

        • bobbert

          You are, possibly, being a little misleading about the symposia conducted by the Ancestral Health Society. While they were conducted on the campuses of UCLA, Harvard, and Berkeley, universities routinely rent out ballroom or auditorium space to anyone who has the cash and is not obviously illegal. This doesn’t imply that the universities endorse the views of their renters.

    • shelwood

      Using the phrase “Big Pharma” tells everyone everything they need to know about you. You really didn’t have to use so many words no one will read.

      • gomerel

        And rejecting everything I wrote because of two words tells me a lot about you too. You think I’m an anti-vaxxer, right? Wrong. I take four prescriptions. But I won’t take statins, an even bigger fraud than the olive oil industry IMHO.

        • shelwood

          You really have wandered onto the wrong site. IDGAF.

        • Mehmeisterjr

          Well, no. Not me, not rejecting everything you wrote, anyhow. I also won’t take statins because I had dreadful reactions to each and every one that I tried. My liver just can’t deal with them and they seem more like a marketing plan than a cure.

          Statins are a high-profit product of dubious value for many people (though I may be a exception.) More power to those for whom they work but for me, they are dangerous. The non-statin plant sterols kinked my muscles up in knots, the exact life-threatening symptoms that the statins create.

          Vaccines, OTOH, are a low-profit center which Big Pharma, yeah there is such a thing, have to be guilted into providing and which have proven safe and effective for centuries.

          I am all for granting exemptions for legitimate medical reasons but when it comes to exposing children to measles just because some bimbo cut a logical shortcut? No. This isn’t some kind of personal liberty issue. This is public health.

          (I don’t think we are arguing on this point, are we?)

          • Umm

            There may have been a time when vaccines were a “low profit center”, but not any more – especially if they can get EVERYONE to consume them. Pharma spends millions of dollars on lobbying. Just look at all the recent proposals in the state legislatures. Legally mandatory medical procedures for everyone (yes, everyone) makes me afraid. What will be the next mandatory medical procedure/medication that everyone must consume? I want to make my own medical decisions, thank you.

          • Most vaccines are given away for free by public health services and non-profits in the third world. Saying they turn a huge profit is absolutely ridiculous.

          • Umm

            Pharmaceutical companies do no give vaccines away. Those “public health services and non-profits” buy them.

          • bobbert

            Just an aside, but I love my fucking statin. I’m lucky enough not to get the side effects (except an occasional leg cramp). OTOH, if you do get the side effects, fuck it.

            This is kind of the deal with any drug, you know? If it causes bad effects for you, personally, stop taking it. Now, vaccines are a bit of an odd case, because you generally only get one or two doses, so by the time you know there’s an adverse reaction, it’s too late. Here, we pretty much have to rely on statistics (whether we want to or not). What’s the probability of the adverse reaction? What’s the probability of the disease (if not vaccinated) damaging or killing you? Any poker player can handle that comparison.

            A further point is that the acceptable threshold for vaccine adverse reactions is much lower than that for normal drug reactions (because you can stop using the normal drug).

      • PunditusMaximus

        Meh, I don’t think anyone who followed the ACA’s passage is a fan of PhRMA.

    • Amy!

      Pretty sure that use of grains isn’t a twentieth century innovation. Anywhere. It’s possible that the industrially-farmed grains post-fertilizer-revolution are deficient in some significant way, but it’s a hard argument to make.

      Paleo, as I understand it, essentially rejects the agricultural revolution. Good luck with that.

      • Msgr_Moment

        Well, rejecting the agricultural revolution would mean abandoning our cities, so there’s that.

      • PunditusMaximus

        I understand where it comes from, though — what we think of as grains and bread (especially the wheat/barley/rye/corn varieties) were hugely re-bred over the past century or so and probably aren’t good for you. It’s not a coincidence that my sister makes these huge bready pizzas out of organic flour (and is happy and full), then tends to feel like dogshit when she eats a regular breadstick from somewhere. Same recipes, roughly, different varietals.

    • Biel_ze_Bubba

      TL, DR. Also, NS (no snark.)
      Get with the program, will ya?

    • Greg Comlish

      I actually read everything you wrote. And actually what you said sounds really reasonable and modest and I wish more people approached the Paleo diet from a more skeptical vantage point like it appears you do.

      I must say, however, that my experience with the Paleo crowd is very different from the image you are painting. You paint a picture of a Paleo crowd that would conceivably tolerate, for example, the consumption of bread; I don’t think that is representative of the Paleo community. I’m vegan and the Paleo advocates I encounter tend to be fanatical and vocally critical of my choices. At first this surprised me since vegans on the whole eat fewer processed foods and more fruits and vegetables than anybody else. And what I came to realize is that most of the Paleo crowd doesn’t care about fruits and vegetables; for them the Paleo diet amounted to essentially the Atkins diet except with a thin veneer of Pseudoscience which they believe as if it were the revealed truth. Obviously this doesn’t appear to be the case with you, but that’s been my experience in general.

      • gomerel

        Thank you. I did not realize there were still so many “me cave man me eat meat” d*ckheads out there. I recommend Marks Daily Apple website (see, there is even fruit in the site title) by Mark Sisson. Mark’s wile was raised a vegetarian. For many years she has done the healthy veganism you refer to plus seafood. Their 20 year old son has been a lacto-ovum vegetarian his whole life. Mark is fine with that. He also published The South Asian Health Solution by Ronesh Sinha, which is “paleo” for Indian lacto vegetarians. Another good resource on flexible paleo is Chris Kresser, who is a doctor of Chinese medicine.

    • Umm

      Well said. Thank you!

  • FlownOver

    “…your Volpe tries his hand at phrenology…”

    Careful… too much and you could go blind!

  • I_Buttle

    Goddamn, Wonkett, you gonna have to ban these fucking comments that you don’t allow. You’ve got people trying to make actual points and they ain’t funny. Fuck that.

  • Drew Miner

    The reality is less headline grabbing, but tremendously more powerful. Amazing things are happening in Autism treatment. Auditory treatments, de-sensitivity training, tailored teaching methods, medications that give these folks a break from symptoms to get on top of their conditions. Not a cure but space to breath, and dance and make a life for themselves. Groups of people learning together, and being accepting, finding strength together. Amazing, amazing stuff. I’m deep in this world, and perk up when I see a headline about Autism. But when I do it’s mostly about Jenny McCarthy or vaccines or something like that rather than this wonderful world and spreading the hope and possibilities, the magnificent human beings you meet on this journey, and the child that gives me hope, for all of us.

    • zerosumgame0005

      I have not kept up on this (too dammed many distractions!) but thanks for giving me stuff to search on to see the advances.

    • Mehmeisterjr

      That’s the great tragedy of the anti-scientific movement. Not only do their idiotic theories fuck up real lives but they undercut funding for the the very science that can help.

  • zerosumgame0005

    well, my fat ass is so paleo it shines like the moon!

  • A Big Sarcastic Fairy!

    There are a bunch of diabetics who SWEAR by the Paleo diet. I call it hokum. Plus can we take Jenny McCarthy and toss her ass off a cliff?

    • Biel_ze_Bubba

      I’d put her on a real paleo diet: mastodon steaks from some of the 10,000-year-old corpses thawing out of the permafrost thanks to the warming climate that she probably denies as well.

  • Incoming Ham

    Republicans know science like the organ grinder’s monkey knows the tango

  • “chiropractic”

    I know a lot of people say they get wonderful results from going to a chiropractor, but I’ve been to three and each time not only did I not get any real relief*, but I felt that the doctor’s offices were the medical building equivalent of the old mobile in the least desirable spot in the trailer park.

    “teevee celebrity chef ”

    At first I read this a teevee celebrity thief. Funny how the mind works, eh?

    “Pat Robertson”

    :::scrunches up face and looks to heaven:::

    “Ah sense the foul stench of one of Satan’s foul minions…out demon! I say ou…..”

    :::Guy on camera 3 grimaces in embarrassment:::

    “Sorry sir! That was all me. I had the cheese and broccoli frittata at lunch today.”

    And finally…

    I don’t know if baseball cures the gay, but it can embarrass Scotsmen.

    A Scottish man was at a baseball game. It was the first

    time he had ever seen the sport so he sat quietly. The

    first batter approached the plate, he took a few swings

    and then hit a double. Everyone was on their feet

    screaming “Run, Run.”

    This happened two more times, with a single and a triple.

    The Scottish man was now exited and ready to get into the

    game. The next batter came up and four balls went by.

    The umpire called “walk” and the batter started on a slow

    trot to first. The Scotchman, extremely excited now, stood

    up and screamed, “R-R-Run ye basstarrd, rrrun!”

    Everyone around him started laughing. So the Scotchman,

    extremely embarrassed, sat back down. A friendly fan,

    seeing the Scotchman’s embarrassment, leaned over and

    said, “He can’t run – he got four balls.”

    The Scotchman then stood up and screamed,

    “Walk with pride, laddie…walk with pride!”

    • PunditusMaximus

      I’m one one the folks who gets a lot of relief from a good chiro. The issue is that the accreditation boards for chiro are even shittier than the accreditation boards for MDs — MD boards tend to obsessively cover for bad docs, while chiro boards ignore bad chiros entirely. Yelp is here for you on this one, and yeah, if you go in for an adjustment and they try to sell you pretty much anything other than a massage to go with (which is complementary for obvious reasons), they are douchebags.

      There are shitty anythings. Hire a shitty plumber, be sad, hire a good plumber, be happy. The more rigorous the accreditation boards, the easier the job is, but Yelp really is your friend.

      • gomerel

        The secret to finding a good chiro is to find one whose web page or yellow page ad does not look like one for a personal injury a-hole lawyer.

        • PunditusMaximus

          Yelp is your friend.

  • Incoming Ham

    In all seriousness, *and this doesn’t happen often*, I have a question: do these parents think that torturing their kids with bleach enemas, weird diets, loads of questionable vitamins and god knows what else is better than the spectrum disorder the kids have? You would go to jail if you did this to another family’s kid but hey, you own this one – so knock yourself out. I feel sorry for the kids with these cruel parents – and saying they do it with the best of intentions doesn’t cut it.

    • Biel_ze_Bubba

      Cruel and stupid is a bad combination. Especially in one’s parents.

    • do these parents think that torturing their kids with bleach enemas, weird diets, loads of questionable vitamins and god knows what else is better than the spectrum disorder the kids have?

      Yes, they do. Read any anti-vaccine forum and you will see these exact arguments made. To these people, autism is quite literally a fate worse than death, and they will readily choose death for themselves and their children rather than accept that doctors know what they’re talking about.

      • bobbert

        They think the blame must be theirs, if they can’t offload it onto somebody else. Fucking humans.

  • Martin Matthews

    Clarification please… where specifically did Mr. Evans claim that the Paleo diet can “cure” autism? I’m searching for the citation/location… I see inferences made, but not a quote. Thanks!

    • bobbert

      Strictly speaking, the link in the original post is to an article that suggests that Mr Evans claims that following the Australian nutritional guidelines will promote autism. The link in that article to an essay by Mr Evans has “been removed”, so I guess you win.

      • Martin Matthews

        Suggests? Promote? So, the specific assertion “Paleo Diet Wackadoo Says He Can Cure Autism” is FALSE then? You too, are CONFOUNDING 2 different things; 1) the notion that food/nutrition affect the EXISTENCE of disorder, and 2) the notion that food/nutrition/diet affect the TRAJECTORY of disorder. Both notions exist as long established scientific reality (you have data otherwise?), regardless of what Mr. Evans’, you, Fare La Volpe, or anyone thinks or believes. I know nothing of Mr. Evans, I just find it hard to believe anyone would actually say that a diet “cures” something – hence my inquiry here, since I have great disrespect for those that overtly libel and hurt others. Indeed, let’s discuss facts, experience, and opinion, but NOT conjecture – you’ve got zero credibility when you’re just making shit up.

  • j hentai

    Tune in next week when your Volpe tries his hand at phrenology for the
    most vulnerable among us: rabid wolves. I’ve still got 7 good fingers
    left and they’re itchin’ to get goin’.

    7 fingers? luxury! i’ve no hands since i took up piranha dentistry and am typing this with my nose!

  • Pierre_de_Fermat

    can the snake oil prevent snake bites?

  • Celtic_Gnome

    The reason the paleo diet works on weight is that it took so much time and energy for those people to get enough calories into them to survive that there wasn’t time to crash on the barcolounger and zone out on Words of Warcraft.

  • topjob66t

    That is it. I am firmly in the crowd who say bull shit.

  • Biel_ze_Bubba

    Italian courts understand science about as well as do ‘Merkin teatards:
    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-20025626

  • Paperless Tiger

    Paleo, like most diets, presumes a single human metabolic type. In reality, humans are polymorphic. There are, in the main, four distinct metabolic types of humans extant, signified by the four blood types, which represent four distinct phases of human adaptation to the dietary changes occasioned by domestication of plant and animal foods. Type O humans are, indeed, a sort of “paleo” type, that is, hunter/gatherer metabolism, so the paleo diet is roughly beneficial for them, although the selection of food is based on speculation. The definitive research has been done by Dr. Peter D’Adamo, who actually made the effort to chemically test foodstuffs for the different metabolic systems.

    • gomerel

      I think the theory behind the blood type diet theory has been completely disproved but my actual point is that Paleo has evolved to take into account different ancestral backgrounds, e.g. Ronesh Sinha’s South Asian Health Solution book, published by Paleo guru Mark Sisson – aimed at Hindu vegetarians.

    • uniquename72

      The concept of blood-type diets has been disproved over and over again. So many times that it’s not even worth the googling to bother providing you with the peer-reviewed literature.

      Of course, if you knew what “peer-reviewed” meant, you wouldn’t bother citing D’Adamo, since he’s never published any clinical trials at all.

  • Msgr_Moment

    The title reminds me of the following groundbreaking work.

  • MrCanoehead

    Any diet can work, because if you have to pay attention to what you’re eating, you don’t eat as much.

  • Martin Matthews

    WHERE do you assert that Mr. Evans “make(s) outrageous claims like they can cure autism with food?”
    Or, did this author FABRICATE this headline? Kindly explain…

    • Thank you so much! I’m glad you enjoyed the article! :)

      If you’d like to know more, all relevant links are provided within the article itself and in the brackets at the end of the article. “Links” are portions of red text that take you from one website to another. Hope that helps!

      Thank you so much for your readership! :)

      • Martin Matthews

        Yes…. I followed that link – it goes to a page/article by Amber Robinson in which she refers to Mr. Evans touting aspects of Paleo as “preventive.” Though I fail to see anything regarding your referenced ascertion that Mr. Evans “claims” that “can cure autism.”

        From what/where specifically are you making that precise inference? (and thus direct accusation). I’m really trying to zero in my research on this – thanks!

        • I’m so glad you liked it! It’s always nice to hear from a fan.

          Hope you tune in next week!

          • Martin Matthews

            …and? Fact or fiction on the headline? Thanks!

  • Guest
  • johndmac

    “He’s kind of a fluoride-fearing loon.” – Fare la Volpe

    Hilarious. The author of The Snake Oil Bulletin believes in swilling fluoride, which by definition is snake oil.

  • Ryan Denniston

    “The key to an A+ grift is to make it universal.”

    I disagree insofar as it’s the dead giveaway and chases all but the wingnut dingbats away. I do think that you need technobabble that can be researched on the Intertubes, but I don’t know if there is a critical factor. Also all Paleo adherents should be fluoride fearing loons, as fluoride did not exist in sufficient concentrations of all that meat the people were eating!

  • Martin Matthews

    To clarify – it seems that NO ONE actually has claimed that the Paleo diet “can cure autism.” Rather, the headline was fabricated (its untrue/a lie) for shock value only. (unless it can be verified).

  • gomerel

    Alzheimer’s – an admittedly small study at UCLA found that an approach pretty much like the Primal Blueprint version of Paleo REVERSED Alzheimer’s in 9 out of 10 subjects. The tenth subject had very advanced Alzheimer’s. This does not “prove” that Paleo is a cure but it is very encouraging. It involved simple things like getting enough sleep and exercise, and (gasp) eliminating refined carbs.

    By the way, I contribute money to conventional Alzheimer’s research.

  • Martin Matthews

    LEGIT or LIBEL? “Paleo Diet Wackadoo Says He Can Cure Autism”

    Was that said? By whom? Where’s the source quotation?

    (This is general query on behalf of all TRUE and HONEST human beings that prefer a world free of libelous conjecture, undue accusation, and fraudulent character assassination. I, and you, likely read things and wonder “did someone REALLY say that?” If they did, they there MUST be a source quote – otherwise the person asserting the quote is overtly lying/libeling.) I know nothing about Mr. Evans, I just find it hard to believe anyone would actually say that. IF he did, well…there you go, but did he? I get that this website is about stirring up shit – that’s okay, but not making up shit (satire and slander differ greatly). What’s the truth here?

  • Diana Michael

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