food/booze news!

Drink To Save the Planet … and Other Fine Reasons To Imbibe

Saturday, April 17: All-you-can-eat oysters and all-you-can-drink beer. These are two very good things, and you can enjoy both at the 3rd Annual Oyster Fest at Hank’s Oyster Bar. Tickets are $75. [Hank's Oyster Bar]

  • Saturday, April 17: Eco-minded drinking, it turns out, is not an empty phrase, but something you can actually do! This Saturday the restaurant Bread and Brew will be pouring samples of organic and “biodynamic” wines along with local craft beers, so you can all get drunk and save the planet, a delightful combination. [Bread and Brew]
  • Saturday, April 17: Because fish, what with all those bones and such, is rather difficult to cook, the restaurant 1789 is offering a cooking class all about how to buy, prepare, cook and serve seasonal fish. The class starts at 10AM and costs $100. [1789]
  • Monday, April 19: Mondays aren’t great days, so to make them more bearable head to Zentan after work for their Monday Jazz nights. They are hosting some of DC’s most talented musicians and are offering drink specials including Blue Moon beers for $5, select specialty cocktails for $10 and small plates for $7. [Zentan]
  • New food: Dolcezza, an Argentine gelato cafe that serves gelato, espresso, and churros, is opening up a new location in Dupont Circle next week, and Manudu, a popular Korean restaurant in Dupont Circle, will be opening a new location at 5th and K in the fall. [Dolcezza, The Triangle]

About the author

Arielle Fleisher is the Wonkabout. She roams D.C. seeking tasty foods, cheap drinks, whole-pig BBQs, think tank events, street fairs and other local horrors.

View all articles by Arielle Fleisher
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1 comment

  1. Sharkey

    Yeah, umm, google “vegan wine”:
    Wine is clarified, or cleared, after fermentation. Some of the ingredients used include:

    - edible gelatins (made from bones)
    - isinglass (made from the swim bladders of fish)
    - casein and potassium caseinate (milk proteins)
    - animal albumin (egg albumin and dried blood powder)

    In the UK beer (bitter) is also commonly fined using isinglass. Many bottled bitters and most lagers are vegan. Guinness is not suitable for vegans. Most spirits are vegan except for Campari (contains cochineal) and some Vodkas (passed through bone charcoal).

    Also of course only a small fraction of wines are made from organically grown grapes.

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